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Linux newbie

I just installed Mandrake 10.0 (downloaded version) on one of my Pentium based PC. I created a non-superuser (only one such user) account during the install and set a password for that user but now when I start Linux it does not ask for that user's password. If I logout and try to login again the screen for providing password appears but even if I do not provide the password I can still enter the system. Could some one please tell me

a) How is this so?
b) How can I log-in as root? The login process doesnot have a stage where I can enter user-id and password. As I said when I start the PC for he first time it just goes to the ordinary user account straightaway (no login screen) and if I logout and try to login again the login screen shows only the ordinary user.
c) Is it important to install an anti virus software? If yes which is a good free one?
d) How does one create a dial-up account for internet?

Thanking all in anticipation.

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Re: Linux newbie

In reply to: Linux newbie

Well, first off, you don't want to log-in as root. That can get you in trouble. I haven't tried it in Mandrake
(you could do it in Red Hat). You have the log-in preference set to "Auto Log-in(best choice for single user). When you log-out, it doesn't know it is still you, so you have to log-in a new user(still you).
It's best to become Root on a case by case basis(either in "Terminal" or when configuring system). Others may(probably) will disagree. I'm not in Linux right now, so I can't check if you can even Log-in as Root(or Superuser). Go to Configure-Login and change from Auto-login if you want to be asked every time.
As far as the internet, Go to "Configure"- "Internet" -
"New Connection" - choose "Dial-up" and answer questions till finished. Sorry that these instructions are a little loose since I'm in Windows right now. Just
take a tour of the tool bar and it's choices, Mandrake 10 is very user friendly. chuck

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Re: Linux newbie

In reply to: Re: Linux newbie

Thank you Chuck. Grateful for the reply.

I am a Linux newbie but not to Unix (worked on Sun Sparcs, IBM RISCS and Bull hw platforms). In fact I started on Unix and only much later got hands on DOS and then all subsequent generations of Windows (and some exposure to Macs too). So I am not too worried about the "trouble" aspect. I would like to get my hands dirty with Linux! As a home user who has luxury of a couple of machines to play with I suppose I have that luxury Happy

And I agree Mandrake 10 is very user friendly (quite unlike the good old unix that I was exposed to).

Regards

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Re: Linux newbie

In reply to: Re: Linux newbie

You problaly did not uncheck the auto login during installation. Right now I don't remember specifically where to change this but I believe it is somewhere in " system configuration", take a look there. I'll be back with more detail info later if you haven't already have the problem solved.

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Un-autologin

In reply to: Re: Linux newbie

star->system->configuration->configure your computer->(root PSW)->boot->auto login-> check..no, don't want autologin..then ok and reboot.

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Re: Un-autologin

In reply to: Un-autologin

To log in as root at graphical login (not recommended, but you know that) when it ask for user name type "root" (without quotes) and in password type your root password. In terminal (for specific task) "su-" (without quotes), enter, then root password. As far as a virus scan goes, some say yes, some say no. Personally I use one on one machine but not on the other. There are several to choose from, I use Clamav. I think all of you other questions have been answered, hope this helps some. - Gary

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Thanks Chuck, Art and GRB.

In reply to: Re: Un-autologin

Thanks a ton guys. Hope I can return the favor sometime.

Regards

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Re: Linux newbie

In reply to: Linux newbie

If you are using kde then go to control center and choose system administration, then go to login manager, click on administartor mode and type in your root password, click on the convenience tab and uncheck auto login. that should do it.

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