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Laptop selection

I need a new laptop for grad school. I only want to spend max $400. I really only need it for writing papers (with Microsoft Office) and doing research for class. I have heard about notebook laptops and Chromebooks but don't know much about them. I'd love some suggestions!

Margaretrosey has chosen the best answer to their question. View answer
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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by Margaretrosey

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At that price range you have to flip the research.

In reply to: Laptop selection

Let's hear what you found. You may be in Austrailia or England so share your short list.

Chromebooks don't run Office in your classic sense. From the web "Microsoft Office Online, the free cloud version of Office, is available as a series of apps for Chromebooks, and you can always use the native Google Drive to open and edit documents and spreadsheets."

So if you have a good internet connection you could try that out. Chromebooks are very cheap and my last 15 inch was a Groupon deal for under 89 bucks to my doorstop. If all you need is to write papers, why not go that cheep?

https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Computers-Accessories-Traditional-Laptop/zgbs/pc/13896615011 has a few sub 400 buck laptops but I'd skip the Chromebooks and HPs.

As to Office, why not Libre Office from Ninite.com if budget is an issue?

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Reply

In reply to: At that price range you have to flip the research.

I'm in the US. And budget isn't an issue outside of the laptop. I just don't see a need to spend a lot on a laptop I won't use that often. I really want it to run traditional Microsoft Office so that's good to know that Chromebooks won't work for that.

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Unsure what folk mean by traditional Office.

In reply to: Reply

While my office still has plenty of Office 2003 licenses we're still using those and since I only need to open Word and Excel plus write Word and Excel documents I went on my last PCs with Libre Office.

I can't tell any difference. Could you?

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In reply to: Unsure what folk mean by traditional Office.

I meant traditional in that you download the program on to your hard drive - not the version you access online.

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Then Libre Office would be traditional.

In reply to: Reply

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Answer
Well if you choose a Chromebook

In reply to: Laptop selection

Google apps has a Spreadheet and Document that can be saved or imported to Word and Excel formats. The problem is that Chromebooks rely on an internet connection 99% of them to be useful.

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Answer
In a student view

In reply to: Laptop selection

From what I have been able to observe in classrooms, more than 80% of the time, laptops are only used to display course content and to take notes.

From these simple uses, we can already say that a laptop should have a good display and keyboard. A good display in order to clearly show the course content without causing eye strain and a good keyboard in order to be able to quickly and easily take notes.

Students also have a tendency to move around a lot. Not just form their home or their dorm to school, but also from class to class and campus to campus. Moreover, it is often difficult for them to find a power outlet to charge their computer.

Chromebooks are laptops which exploit the Chrome operating system.

Free and open-source, Chrome OS was developed by Google in order to offer an alternative to entry-level Windows PCs which are often slow and of mediocre quality.

Price is a big advantage in favor of Chromebooks, and which makes them of particular interest to students. Given that the manufacturers are not required to pay for licenses in order to integrate Chrome OS with their computers, there is one fewer cost passed on to the consumer.

Contrary to entry-level Windows PC where the manufacturers are forced to cut corners in order to lower the price, Chromebooks always have a superior build quality.

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