Windows Vista forum

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Laptop Battery Falls Out, Now Vista Doesn't Boot

by technoob09 / March 16, 2009 3:33 PM PDT

Laptop in question: HP Pavilion DV2000, running Windows Vista Home (I think 32-bit).

Today, I was using my laptop, running on battery power only. Unfortunately, the battery no longer locks. I moved the laptop and the battery fell out. Naturally, as was not plugged in to an external power source, my laptop shut off.

Upon re-inserting the battery (and plugging in the laptop to an external power source for good measure), I received the "Windows Error Recovery" screen, presenting me with:

Safe Mode
Safe Mode with Networking
Safe Mode with Command Prompt
Start Windows Normally

I tried "Start Windows Normally", and after a loading screen (Microsoft Corporation at bottom), then the screen went black. I could see the mouse on screen, yet Vista would not boot up.

I manually shut down my computer and this time selected "Safe Mode": same thing, loading screen, then screen goes black with mouse, Vista does not load.

I then hit "F7" to get to the "Advanced Boot Options":

Repair your computer
Safe mode

Safe mode with networking
Safe mode with command prompt
Enable boot logging
Enable low resolution video (640

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boot file corrupted due to shut down
by Techie_Master / March 16, 2009 10:43 PM PDT

i think your windows vista boot file may be corrupted due to shut down unfortunaturely. I recommended you please restore you computer windows late restore point date.

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I think the bootfile ...
by Kees Bakker / March 16, 2009 10:46 PM PDT

isn't included in the System Restore, because it won't change in normal circumstances. So I really doubt if that will help.

The "system recovery options" the OP only mentioned but didn't do might be more interesting. Maybe he should tell more on that!

Kees

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Doubtful...
by John.Wilkinson / March 17, 2009 4:08 AM PDT

Since the original poster gets past "a loading screen (Microsoft Corporation at bottom)," the boot file is pretty much irrelevant...its run has completed and Windows is loading.

Since Safe Mode fails, there are two primary options:
1.) Borrow a friend's retail Windows Vista DVD and use it to launch System Restore, choosing the latest restore point. (For this purpose it is legal.)
2.) Use the manufacturer's "Repair your computer" feature, keeping in mind it may result in the loss of installed programs and possibly personal files as well, depending on how it is designed/configured.

John

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Don't Want to Lose My Files...
by technoob09 / March 17, 2009 7:15 AM PDT
In reply to: Doubtful...

John, thanks for the tips.

I've never actually made a system restore point myself - does Vista do that for me, and if so, how frequently?

I ask simply because I have a lot of files which I have not backed up -- and I don't want System Restore to take my computer back too far (assuming before I downloaded my pictures, music, etc.)

Secondly, do you know anything about "Startup Repair" and how I would go about it?

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Repair options...
by John.Wilkinson / March 17, 2009 11:49 AM PDT

-> Restore points are automatically made by Windows Vista at regular intervals (around every 24 hours of use) as well as whenever updates are installed. Many program installers also create restore points automatically.

-> System Restore does not roll back your personal files, only Windows and installed applications. That's one key difference between it and system recovery.

-> Startup Repair may work, but you can only access that option from a retail Windows Vista DVD, using the "Repair my computer" link at the bottom of the third screen, after selecting regional settings.

John

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2 More Questions
by technoob09 / March 17, 2009 12:01 PM PDT
In reply to: Repair options...
John, once again for your help.

Good to know that ?System Restore? doesn't roll back personal files.

1) Is "Startup Repair" ALSO available under "Advanced Boot Options" (when hitting F7 at startup) and then going to "Repair your computer" [without the Vista DVD]?

2) Is it possible that the sudden loss of power corrupted either the operating system or the file system? (Is this even a realistic possibility?)

Thanks!
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No and yes...
by John.Wilkinson / March 17, 2009 12:07 PM PDT
In reply to: 2 More Questions

1.) Is "Startup Repair" ALSO available under "Advanced Boot Options" (when hitting F7 at startup) and then going to "Repair your computer" [without the Vista DVD]?
-> Unfortunately not. It is only available from the Windows Vista DVD and does not apply to most 'system recovery' DVDs supplied by manufacturers as Windows Vista DVD alternatives.

2.) Is it possible that the sudden loss of power corrupted either the operating system or the file system? (Is this even a realistic possibility?)
-> If something was in the process of writing to a system file at the time of the crash it is entirely possible. Usually 'last known good config' will fix such issues, but it is not uncommon for the issue to lie outside the scope of the feature, making repair more difficult.

John

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BAD NEWS
by technoob09 / March 17, 2009 2:49 PM PDT
In reply to: No and yes...

Nothing seems to be working John:

1) I first tried to use System Restore. John, you said "restore points are automatically made by Windows Vista at regular intervals (around every 24 hours of use) as well as whenever updates are installed. Many program installers also create restore points automatically." FOR SOME REASON, in the System Restore screen, it said I had no restore points!? So, I was stopped there.

2) Then, even though you said Startup Repair "is only available from the Windows Vista DVD and does not apply to most 'system recovery' DVDs supplied by manufacturers as Windows Vista DVD alternatives", I figured what the heck, and inserted my Windows Vista Recovery DVD. John, you were right, it didn't work.

3) I even tried checking out the "Repair your computer" option in the "Advanced Boot Options" menu [F7 to get Windows Boot Manager, then F8 to get "Advanced Boot Options"]. "Repair your computer" then brought me to "System Recovery Options", where it gave me the options:

-"To access recovery options log on as a local user."
-"To access the command prompt as well, log on using an administrator account."

4) For the heck of it, I even did the diagnostic that checks the hard drive for error (found under "Windows Boot Manager"), and when I came back to see what had happened, it had completed and restarted the computer...


I really don't want to lose my files...but am I stuck?

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You can extract those files...
by John.Wilkinson / March 17, 2009 2:53 PM PDT
In reply to: BAD NEWS

If you connect your hard drive to another computer, preferably using an external hard drive enclosure, you can then browse the contents of your hard drive, provided you take ownership as needed to gain access to your personal files. You can copy all of your files off before continuing, ensuring you do not suffer massive data loss.

John


P.S. It is a good idea to create regular backups, just in case you do lose your files in situations such as this.

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