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Is my PC good enough to play a game?

I am hoping some computer savory folks can help me, because I just don't understand. I recently bought a Gateway T-1628 it has Vista Home premium (32 bit).
I want to play Final Fantasy xi. I went to the official site and it has a program that assess your system to see if you can play it. It gave me a score of 2999 which ranked me right in the middle saying... "We assume that your computer can run FINAL FANTASY XI for Windows enjoyably with the default settings. If your video card exceeds the recommended system requirements, we recommend that you increase the resolution of FINAL FANTASY XI for Windows. FINAL FANTASY XI might run just as smoothly as in low resolution mode. " The video card list at the site doesn't have my video card listed. I have no idea what series my card is in. I have searched online and can't figure it out either. The laptop played Sims2 with 2 expansions and at times the graphics went funky. I don't want to buy FFXI just to find out it doesn't play after all. Is FFXI graphic intense? More so than Sims2? The game and laptop specs are below. I appreciate any help/advice given.

The Recommended game specs
Operating System:Windows

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Not that great a video solution.

In reply to: Is my PC good enough to play a game?

It's not in the league of most desktop 3D cards so don't expect much here. Go ahead and use it's suggested settings and alway try any DEMO version before buying a game. Sorry if I'm unclear here so excuse my next blunt statement -> No. You can't upgrade the video card. And no, it's not a "read 3D" solution.
Bob

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It'll probably work

In reply to: Is my PC good enough to play a game?

It'll probably work, but given it's a laptop, I wouldn't expect too much.

Laptops just do not make for good gaming systems, but usually it's something people have to figure out on their own the hard way before they believe it.

You want to play FFXI, find an old PS2 that had the hard drive bay, or get the 360 version. Or just play it on a desktop system. Don't do it on a laptop unless you enjoy painful experiences.

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it'll probably work

In reply to: It'll probably work

Why aren't laptops good gaming machines? They overheat?

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Why aren't laptops good gaming machines?

In reply to: it'll probably work

The primary reason is that in the form factor it's very difficult to expel the heat generated by the top tier video cards (some 100+ Watts.)

And if you think this will be fixed anytime soon the bar is raised and more GPU processing power is needed for the latest games. For a fine example look at Crysis. There is no machine made today that can run it at its maximum settings and people have tried.
Bob

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Why aren't laptops good gaming machines?

In reply to: Why aren't laptops good gaming machines?

If I got a laptop cooler, (the pad thing it sits on) will that help dispell some heat issues? If the laptop gets overheated, it will just break right? Is there a particular time limit one should adhere to when being on a laptop. I understand that the more process power used (for gaming) contributes to the heat and so it gets hotter faster. But what about just being on it maybe on an instant messenger or surfing web for 5-6 hours?

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That's one

In reply to: it'll probably work

That's one reason: heat. And no, a laptop cooler will in no way draw off enough heat to make any real difference when we're talking about gaming.

Other reasons include high latency displays -- you'll see ghosting effects -- small screen sizes with limited resolution options, cramped keyboards, underpowered CPUs and GPUs compared to desktop versions, lack of RAM and RAM capacity, and the inability to upgrade the hardware.

If you want to play PC games, get a desktop. If you want to play games on the road, get a DS and/or PSP. If you want to get the most gaming bang for your buck, get a console. Leave laptops for being portable word processors, web browsers, and even DVD players, NOT gaming systems.

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