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Question

Is CPU overclocking worth it for gaming?

by Whiskeyfire / September 6, 2013 2:57 PM PDT

I am about to build my second PC
I am tossing up between getting a i5 4670 or a i5 4670K
The GPU i have chosen is the GTX 780
Is overclocking really worth the money you pay for gaming performance?
If I do get the 4670K I will have to buy a overclock-able motherboard and a good CPU cooler. Note: 700W PSU

GA-H87N to GA-Z87N + $25
i5 4670 to i5 4670K + 30
Thermal take contac 21 to corsair H80i + $95

So it will cost me around $150 Australian dollars = $137 US dollars

Is it worth spending that much to get more gaming performance?
Will the 4670 bottle neck the GTX 780?

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All Answers

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Answer
Have to be careful with over clocking
by Johnny_S / September 6, 2013 9:26 PM PDT

Much of over clocking these days is about one side of the processor. Adjusting the Front Side Bus speed. The negatives of over clocking are increased heat, a strain on memory (RAM) and a strain on other components.
Is it worth a few percentage points or frame rates? I think you have to realize that for most games over clocking the CPU does very little to improve performance. Its about the graphics and what graphic card you have. This is where you want to focus your money. Also, make sure your power supply can handle future card upgrades. 700 watts PSU is good so you have headroom for later upgrades. Don't under buy a card if you have a big monitor because more pixels means more graphic power. Motherboards that over clock are great and make it easier but you still must watch for heat issues. This goes for GPU overclocking and CPU over clocking. A unstable over clock will only provide grief and reduce life of component and that may be not a good thing.

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Answer
Generic answer
by Steven Haninger / September 6, 2013 10:06 PM PDT

Buy the tool you need for the job. If it's important to dig a 10 foot hole, get a heavy gauge steel shovel. Don't try to use a cheaper one and step on it harder.

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Answer
Quality matters
by Willy / September 7, 2013 12:11 AM PDT

It is, what it is.

If it comes "OC'ed" then it tends to handle things better if from the manufacturer. That said, any OC'ing must be accompanied by better cooling and attention to details. If you plan to OC on your own because you can do it and even if well cooled, expect a problem sooner or later. You're pushing the specs of the device until it at least a shorten life-cycle or worse it fails. The whole point, the better the quality and provided intention of use will anything last. Alas, doing any OC'ing you push it to happy medium NOT the extreme, a point where it seems to settle and/or wants to remain stable, anything else is at your risk. If spending a few extra dollars makes for a better experience, do it, because if you decide to rely on cheaper, then usually that's what you get and the cost of failed device. Take my advise and do this from the git, not later when things start to get weird or falter, then it maybe too late due to heat stress damage. you decide...

tada -----Willy Happy

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Answer
The only problem I've found
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / September 7, 2013 1:09 AM PDT

Is that some overclockers expected the overclocking to work or demand support for the odd crashes. If you are into stability, you don't do this. If you don't mind a little trouble or crashing to the point of a wipe out, then go ahead.
Bob

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Answer
No!
by Bob__B / September 7, 2013 1:26 AM PDT

Leave it stock and let turbo do the overclocking.

You get playing with that stuff and you might open a 'can of worms'.
Not to mention that if you smoke something it can get expensive.

What's the difference between 50 fps and 55 fps?
Other than bragging rights.

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I agree with all the above.
by mopscare42 / September 8, 2013 5:57 AM PDT
In reply to: No!

OC is not worth the time and trouble. Leave it stock and let the turbo take care of things when it's under load.
I overclocked once and the only difference I saw was the temp climbing up 15c. no noticeable difference in performance.

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