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Question

Is Concrete the next Coal? (CO2 source)

by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 12, 2015 12:01 PM PDT

From a coal site "Complete combustion of 1 short ton (2,000 pounds) of this coal will generate about 5,720 pounds (2.86 short tons) of carbon dioxide."

http://www.buildinggreen.com/features/flyash/appendixa.cfm and other sources cite 1 ton of concrete causes 1 ton of CO2 emissions.

Lesson. Everything we do seems to emit gas.

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All Answers

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Answer
Think "cascade effect"
by Steven Haninger / August 12, 2015 1:12 PM PDT

In an effort to allow all to live longer we develop drugs and medicines that allow the weakest genes to continue. We produce "super bugs" by piling on the antibiotics. We kill off pesky and harmful insects with chemical and create other kinds of super bugs. We try to defy mom nature but we always lose the fight with her because she is so patient while we are not. There was a time when carbon was being deposited in the ground as life died off rather rapidly. But, prior to that, the atmosphere was heavy with CO2 though man hadn't been around to fracture the eco-system. Mom nature was charging up a battery for us. We are now using up that charge. When it runs out, mom could do it again. We could come back as gasoline in the tanks of future vehicles. The cascade is on the way.

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Answer
Do like the Egyptians
by James Denison / August 13, 2015 12:40 AM PDT
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Answer
CO2 buried under surface
by Willy / August 13, 2015 8:23 AM PDT

Maybe 10K yrs. ago or further, a supposed release of CO2 from the N.Sea area or by the Norwegian area gave-up deposits of CO2. Maybe a earthquake or some other natural event caused it to be loosen and of course turned to gas. This also a common occurrence even now but at greatly reduced levels. Any so-called sea mining will also produce similar CO2 releases, which already is happening the Asian region drilling for oil and/or sub-surfaces of sea bottoms. This also is another real major source of CO2. Next, if a another natural release was to happen it may cause a "ice age" to happen sooner rather than later. We're talking *MASSIVE* release and it will be a climate changer. This is all natural excluding mining and drilling. Go figure, Mother nature will trump us yet, we only hasten it. What me worry, I got a pot to piss on. duh! -----Willy Happy

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Answer
Biosphere AZ
by theNetnest / August 13, 2015 3:25 PM PDT
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biosphere_2

"oxygen decline: ...This concealed the underlying process until an investigation by Jeff Severinghaus and Wallace Broecker of Columbia University's Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory using isotopic analysis showed that carbon dioxide was reacting with exposed concrete inside Biosphere 2 to form calcium carbonate, thereby sequestering both carbon and oxygen."
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