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Installing/Uninstalling software/programs

Windows Vista Home Premium, 32 bit

Vista SP2

I log in via a limited user account. But if I need to install a program. I seem to be able to do so by typing in the admin password when prompted

So if I install something, lets say java and I do it from the limited user account, but with the admin password, what negative can come from it?

What about using the remove program function while logged in on limited user account? I seem to be able to do taht too with using the admin password when prompted

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When you enter in that password

In reply to: Installing/Uninstalling software/programs

When you enter in that password, that installer program is then run under that administrative account and has the same level of access as that administrative account.

Different processes on Windows, and really pretty much any modern OS, can run as different users. Each user may have varying degrees of access to the system. Every time you enter in that administrative password, you are potentially opening pandora's box. The problem is that the alternative is the program cannot be installed and thus used, so you must consider your actions carefully. And by even asking this question, you're already well on the way down the correct path. You have a ways to go yet, but you're at least going in the right direction.

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On Vista And Windows 7, It Usually Works Fine

In reply to: Installing/Uninstalling software/programs

Basically, you're running the program uninstall as administrator which allows the correct permissions to remove the correct system files.. I have seen a few occasions where the permissions were locked so that only a specific administrator could do the removal.. In that case, you'd need to type in the correct administrator log in, not just any administrator, but the correct one for the permissions.

Personally, I prefer to perform the install, or uninstall, from an actual administrator login, especially with complex programs, simply to make sure everything gets done the best way possible.. A little extra time will potentially prevent a lot of troubles should something not work as wished.

Hope this helps.

Grif

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(NT) Did you resolve this?

In reply to: Installing/Uninstalling software/programs

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yes

In reply to: Did you resolve this?

thanks all. So I see much can be done via the standard user account as long as one has admin password.

thanks all

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