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Inhomogenities, asymmetries and what's left over.

by crowsfoot / January 3, 2012 2:22 PM PST
http://www.closertotruth.com/cosmos

From this page, you should bookmark it. Each little blue TV symbol here, opens a whole other page with many more pages on the subtopic.

I love this stuff.

Enough is enough. But only when all the questions have answers. You tell me.
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Don't know waht's wrong with the link
by crowsfoot / January 3, 2012 2:27 PM PST
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Sea Monkys
by crowsfoot / January 4, 2012 6:01 PM PST
In reply to: Okay
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Don't you know that we are a doodad
by Diana Forum moderator / January 4, 2012 8:56 PM PST
In reply to: Sea Monkys

on a cat's collar?

Diana

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Ha Ha!
by crowsfoot / January 5, 2012 7:47 PM PST

Don't you have to take the red pill to know that? Are you a red pill taker? Metaphysics.

One interesting thing I've learned from watching this series is that the universe didn't necessarily all drop out of inflation, all at once. That it may have been<span id="INSERTION_MARKER"> only regional. One idea is that the majority may still be in the primorital inflationary state, where time and space are not yet condensed.

AND,
it's not clear whether our region was too cool to support the conditions of inflation, or so very hot and dense that things had no where else to go but to crystalize.

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They say that
by crowsfoot / January 5, 2012 8:48 PM PST
In reply to: Ha Ha!

it was a quantum tunneling event that caused the whole thing from not dropping back into a black hole in the first place. And apparently the whole thing came from less than a gram of matter. Matter is not mass, you understand. Matter is derived from mass. And energy. But it's major consequence is a thing that comes directly from relativity. it's a thing twisted, so as we don't see it in everyday experience.. And it's only relevant in comparison to motion from within space/time. Mass and energy are constant, and strictly conserved. It's only the frame of reference and motion that changes their values. You only get out what you put in. And it's been so ever since the breaking of symmetries that happened at the end of inflation.

Maybe we can do the experiment ourselves. Creating a universe. Perfectly safe, you know. The new universe will "neck-off" before it blows us all up. Or eats us alive. The numbers say so. Trust me.

The base question remains. Are we the first? Secondarily, does it matter? We are given reason and logic.

And a wonderful question and set of facts to chew on.

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(NT) Everything is so quantum - that is so yesterday. ;-)
by Diana Forum moderator / January 5, 2012 9:18 PM PST
In reply to: They say that
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LOL!
by crowsfoot / January 5, 2012 11:49 PM PST

It's 2012!

Strings baby, strings!

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(NT) Don't forget membranes
by Diana Forum moderator / January 6, 2012 9:37 AM PST
In reply to: LOL!
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I'm having a gark enough time following this stuff
by crowsfoot / January 8, 2012 2:40 PM PST
In reply to: Don't forget membranes

without branes! Confused

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Mass is not mater.
by crowsfoot / January 8, 2012 4:13 PM PST

Mass is an effect derived from inertia.

Inertia is caused by the counter rotating spins of the quarks within an electron, proton or neutron. Like the blades of a helicopter in motion, the tip of the trailing edge goes slower than the tip of the leading. Since the leading edge is going relatively faster, it's going closer to the speed of light. So it warps space/time more. Thus inertia. And what we see as mass.

So all we have to do is bring in gravity, and we're there!

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And there's a difference between
by crowsfoot / January 8, 2012 4:40 PM PST
In reply to: Mass is not mater.

inertia and momentum. Another function of space/time. And it's warpage in relation to relitive speed. There's no center to be compared to. Angular momentum is strictly conserved. Orbiting causes no loss.

Not what would be observed if there was an outside frame of reference.

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My most intimate experence between
by crowsfoot / January 8, 2012 5:44 PM PST
In reply to: Mass is not mater.

mass, inertia. Momentum and time,,, has to do with why does my hammer have such a great influence<span id="INSERTION_MARKER"> between it and a nail?

Why, if your hammer is heaver, or traveling faster, does it have more of an impact? It's clearly the twisting of space/time. IMO.

Inertia.

My idea is that there are things within the fundamental particles that are already traveling at close to the speed of light. That their leading edges become "heaver" with any increase in speed. Relatively. And that's where momentum and inertia originaly comes from.

I think we grossly under estimate relativity.

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That "perfectly safe" universe
by Steven Haninger / January 5, 2012 9:26 PM PST
In reply to: They say that

Does that mean free from aging and death? Or perhaps the ability to transition our age back and forth at will? Some think that such a state may exist already but that we've no way to envision it accurately.

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Where DID you get "perfectly safe universe" from?
by crowsfoot / January 5, 2012 10:34 PM PST

Did I say that? Really? (I can hardly bring myself to reread my stuff anymore. I've been scolded so much.)

If you want to go for aging and death, I can do that. In fact it's about all I do. It used to be girls and drugs and carburetors. Now it's medicine and who's died and surgical procedures. Aches and pains.

Perfectly safe sounds kind'a boring.

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From here...your own post
by Steven Haninger / January 5, 2012 10:45 PM PST
"Maybe we can do the experiment ourselves. Creating a universe. Perfectly
safe, you know.
The new universe will "neck-off" before it blows us all
up. Or eats us alive. The numbers say so. Trust me."
(underline is mine)

It could have been how I read it and not as you meant to write. Being that the two sentences were not exactly complete, one gets left to fill in blanks. I can't claim to have been good at "fill in the blank" type quizzes.
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Thanks for the explanation.
by crowsfoot / January 5, 2012 11:40 PM PST

You didn't watch all the vids or you would have picked up on the humor.

To get back on subject... To create a universe in the lab (if it were possible) would require a bit of trust that it wouldn't gobble us all up. "perfectly safe!" Irony. Sarcasm, You see?

Sorry for the misintepretaion. Politics on the brain i guess.

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