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Info on Marantz 7000 speakers. (HELP)

I have a pair of vintage marantz floor speakers model 7000. I can't find anything relevant about these. They are spittin image of the Marantz challenger Vll. So i thought id try asking on here.
Any info helps.

Ynot8920 has chosen the best answer to their question. View answer
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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by Ynot8920

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Not exactly

In reply to: This what you are looking for?

I guess what im looking for is background about them. You know

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Is there something unique about these...

In reply to: Not exactly

speakers?

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Not that im aware of.

In reply to: Is there something unique about these...

I cant find anything about them as in when they were made price range ect.
I had someone mention that they might be a demo make or something. Im just curious. I contacted marantz us. And the guy said hes never hurd.

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My advice is to clear up your question.

In reply to: Not that im aware of.

The first reply told me all I needed for specs and a bit more. Plus it noted they were made in the 1980's.

Try to avoid having folk guess what you really want to know.

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(NT) My apologies

In reply to: My advice is to clear up your question.

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Additional reading FWIW

In reply to: My apologies

I owned a Marantz receiver in the early '70. During that time, Marantz products were reputed to be of near audiophile quality at reasonable prices. They competed with Japanese brands from Pioneer, Sansui, etc., but tended to out perform these popular mainstream products. There's a PDF in this listing you might want to look at:

https://www.google.com/search?q=was+Marantz+made+in+USA&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=marantz+audio+history+library

Now Marantz, as I recall, wasn't known for speaker during that time. Offerings from Wharfdale, JBL, Boston Acoustics and other names long gone were the choices of audiophiles. I had a pair of JBL L65 speakers which are still with me. What I can tell you is that, if you want to hear them at their best, get the foam surrounds replaced in the woofers and get any capacitors in the crossover circuits replaced. Damaged cones can sometimes be replaced as well but speaker repair by professionals isn't cheap. I had my JBLs repaired in that way many years ago.

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Exactly

In reply to: Additional reading FWIW

Right now the situation is similar. Their AV receivers are pretty good but they don't even make any speakers any longer (that I am aware of).

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Awesome

In reply to: Additional reading FWIW

These marantz are superb. Very well kept. Thank you on the foam and replacing capacitors i will. What do you suggest about the internal wiring? I belive its copper old and very stiff. Should i replace them or leave as is?

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Copper wire doesn't go bad

In reply to: Awesome

You might re-do any mechanical connections such as spade lugs. I don't know what sort of terminals those may have but you'll want to make sure they're solid. As well, if they have attenuators for the mid range and tweeters, these are like rheostats and could use some sort of contact cleaner that removes oxidation on such things. I don't know Marantz speakers or even if Marantz actually made them. From the date noted in another reply, these may have been produced during a time when Marantz had gotten away from it's attention to quality as being its first objective.

Marantz was known for tube type amplifiers and was rated quite highly in the audio world. McIntosh was another in the small crowd of elite products. Marantz was one US brand that faired quite well when transistors began to replace tubes. The Japanese were well ahead of the US manufacturers in this endeavor as they spent a lot of research time perfecting transistors that could be used in audio applications. US manufacturers were cutting corners to compete but Marantz stayed on track by not giving up on quality. What I remember was lifting a Marantz solid state amp and comparing its weight to that of...let's say...a Pioneer. The Marantz of stated equivalent power was much heftier. They used huge transformers in those things for both the power supply and output stages. A classic Marantz 2270 weighed nearly 40 pounds. I remember disputes about power and the Japanese versions stating their's as "peak" while Marantz and the better manufacturers used RMS. A 70 watt per channel Marantz would blow a Japanese 100 watt system apart in a side by side test. Unfortunately, Marantz started to give way to marketing pressure to manufacture such things as turntables and other input devices but I was unaware of their entry into the speaker market. But, as other manufacturers were doing well by putting together entire systems, I'm not surprised that Marantz joined in that game rather than stick with what they did best. I recall that Marantz quality took a hit and just about disappeared. In recent years, it seems to have rediscovered where it came from and has regained some of its old reputation.

Good luck with your speaker project. I know I've seen DIY speaker repair kits on line if you want to research that. You'll need to remove yours from the cabinet and find the model #s. The worst thing that would happen to speakers is a blown coil. Either the windings would come loose due to heat melting the adhesive or they'd actually burn out due to a failed output transistor. If a coil is bad, you find a suitable replacement speaker for both channels.

Sorry to be long winded but I miss my old Marantz 2200 series receiver. It would have cost me more to fix it than to buy a new rig when it finally became unreliable.

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Thank you for your help.

In reply to: Copper wire doesn't go bad

That is very interesting thank you for your time.
And i will start this lil project on pay day lol. And may your 2200 rest in peace. And forever be loud. Happy
thank you again.

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