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I need to raplace my Mother board.

by wjlan / May 24, 2007 12:13 AM PDT

Any suggestions on a good and easy to install one? I am not real good with this stuff so it has to be easy.

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Things to consider. . .
by Coryphaeus / May 24, 2007 2:31 AM PDT

(don't ask me how I know).

Price - within your pocketbook.

Match processor with motherboard as in choose the processor then find a motherboard that accepts it.

Choose speed, core. Do you need a dual core or single core? Dual core is good for running several high intensity processes at once. Single core is good for 90% of average users.

RAM - match it with the motherboard. One Gig is fine, two Gig close to overkill. Above two Gig is for bragging rights only unless you are trying to decode the human genome.

Hard and optical drives - most motherboards today have both IDE and SATA ports. Match the board to your existing drive types. Don't get a full SATA board if your drives are IDE, they won't work together.

Video, audio - If you have on board video and audio, find a board with the same. If you have cards, find a board that will accept what you currently have. If you have on board and want to upgrade to cards, find the motherboard that will accept sound and video cards of your choice. Video cards come in many flavors and unless you are a hard core gamer, 128 Meg of video RAM is enough. Same with sound. Unless you want to run digital out with surround sound, a standard board is fine. I bought a full blown digital sound card with optical out and 7.1 surround sound. I've never used the features.

Dialup - need a modem? Most motherboards do not have built in analog modems.

Ethernet - the newer boards have Gigabit LAN ports built in. But they work with all, 10/100/1000, LAN facilities.

Have fun.


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Forgot to mention. . .
by Coryphaeus / May 24, 2007 2:36 AM PDT

If you're running Vista, or going to, all bets are off. Vista is still broken for upgrading.

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(NT) But I can install XP if I get a new one with Vista right?
by wjlan / May 24, 2007 3:45 AM PDT
In reply to: Forgot to mention. . .
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All pretty much the same
by jackson dougless / May 24, 2007 2:36 AM PDT

There's really only one way to install a motherboard, so there's no easy or hard way, because those imply multiple options.

I will say that if you don't feel confident in your skills, to have someone else do it for you. It's real easy to screw something up, even if you know what you're doing. I made a simple mistake not too long ago, and shorted out a motherboard while I was switching cases. It was a learning experience to say the least, but a somewhat painful one since I had only my laptop for about a week while waiting for a replacement.

It'd be worth the extra money to have some computer shop do it. That way, if they make a mistake, they're the ones who are obliged to fix it at no additional cost to you.

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Just general info
by eddie11013 / May 24, 2007 2:38 AM PDT

You may need to reformat after you replace your motherboard, therefore, before you go any further, make backups of everything. Make sure you have all necessary disc's, like windows xp, sp2, drivers, etc. In addition, you may get some direct support from the computer maker, if they have a forum for such things. Like dealing with heat sinks, glue, etc.
Good luck,

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Identify your computer first
by linkit / May 24, 2007 3:34 AM PDT

You need a motherboard for what computer model? Is it for the SHUTTLE model you mentioned in another discussion? If so, you may have to purchase from a small group of motherboards that will fit your case.

I'd total a cost figure for the repair and weigh that against getting a new computer.

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by linkit / May 24, 2007 3:39 AM PDT
"I'd total a cost figure for the repair and weigh that against getting a new computer."

I'd total a price figure for the *replacement* and related expenses. Then, I'd weigh that against the cost of getting a new computer. I think a new computer may win here.
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ok so then ...
by wjlan / May 24, 2007 3:43 AM PDT
In reply to: Correction

If I do get a new pc can I move my hard drive over and just keep my stuff that way? I have lots on my current hard drive that I dont want to lose. I also have another pc networked thru this one. This is getting complicated to me !!! I dont want to lose all of my stuff on the hard drive...

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Sure. Just install it as a secondary hard drive
by linkit / May 24, 2007 3:52 AM PDT
In reply to: ok so then ...

You can install your current hard drive as a secondary hard drive in the new computer and then access your files. You don't get to keep the OS, but you do get to keep your personal files.

As always, making a finalized backup copy to CD or DVD is safer than storing those "I don't want to lose" files on a hard drive.

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