Speakeasy forum

General discussion

I agree quite heartily with this comment by Obama

by Steven Haninger / September 18, 2009 10:15 AM PDT

I thought this hit the nail squarely. I'm not posting it as political but as an example of what I feel is a media disservice to the public who rely on them for news and views. Lock it....delete it if you feel it's against the TOS but, IMO, it needs to be said.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32920370/ns/politics-white_house/

"The 24-hour news cycle and cable television and blogs and all this ? they focus on the most extreme elements on both sides," Obama said. "They can't get enough of conflict. It's catnip to the media right now."

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: I agree quite heartily with this comment by Obama
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: I agree quite heartily with this comment by Obama
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
24 hour news cycle...
by J. Vega / September 18, 2009 10:37 AM PDT

The 24 hour news cycle on cable TV started over 29 years ago, with CNN. It started the change in news and the internet later intensified and quickened the rate of change. It's not a "right now" thing, it has been there and building all these years.

Collapse -
Well...they covered it, but maybe they missed the story?
by EdHannigan / September 18, 2009 10:54 AM PDT
MSNBC also pointed to its own reporting. "Just like every other network mentioned in the ad, MSNBC covered last Saturday's protest," the network said in a statement.

Yeah, I watched some of their "coverage". They referred to it as a rally of hatred, downplayed the numbers, etc.
Collapse -
No doubt about it...
by J. Vega / September 18, 2009 10:59 AM PDT

Now doubt about it, the National Mall has shrunk. Now a group of a few thousand people fills it up (grin).

Collapse -
Also, what they missed was...
by EdHannigan / September 18, 2009 11:00 AM PDT

that it was going to happen. Took them all by surprise and caused some soiled pants among politicians in DC.

Collapse -
RE: a rally of hatred
by JP Bill / September 18, 2009 11:35 AM PDT

I watched it...I could feel the "love"

Just like the other tea party

Do you think it was a coincidence they called it a tea party?

Collapse -
They covered it. So did CNN. Fox was wrong (or lying).
by Josh K / September 21, 2009 1:46 AM PDT

End of story.

Collapse -
Nope
by EdHannigan / September 21, 2009 2:25 AM PDT

You just don't get it. Like the media.

End of story.

Collapse -
u know... that's just a cop out response.
by grimgraphix / September 21, 2009 3:00 AM PDT
In reply to: Nope

It is the equivalent of stating... " I'm right. and you are stoooopid " ... and you use it to end just about every debate you engage in.

You are smarter than that and most of the people on this board are too.

Collapse -
No it's not...
by EdHannigan / September 21, 2009 6:31 AM PDT

Why repeat what has already been said? If he cared to read it he'd know why I said that.

And you use it to end just about every debate you engage in.
Nope. That's just a lie.

Collapse -
Did CNN and MSNBC provide live coverage or didn't they?
by Josh K / September 21, 2009 7:16 AM PDT
In reply to: Nope

It's a simple Yes/No question; there's nothing to "get."

Hint: The answer is "Yes."

Collapse -
Did they MISS THE STORY or not?
by EdHannigan / September 21, 2009 7:22 AM PDT

That is what it's about, NOT "did they cover it."

Duh!

Collapse -
RE: "did they cover it."
by JP Bill / September 21, 2009 7:25 AM PDT

With a blanket?

Did the "miss the story"?

Were they shooting at it?

Collapse -
It's not that simple...
by J. Vega / September 21, 2009 8:46 AM PDT

It's not as simple as yes or no. Look at the current ACORN scandal. Yes, you could say they are now covering it, but a question remains - what took them so long?

Collapse -
Same for Van Jones....
by EdHannigan / September 21, 2009 9:25 AM PDT

SOP.

Collapse -
(NT) All you guys crack me up.
by grimgraphix / September 18, 2009 12:28 PM PDT
Collapse -
It's good that you are so easily amused.
by EdHannigan / September 18, 2009 10:21 PM PDT

No need to jingle the shiny keys then.

Collapse -
Some are amused by watching
by JP Bill / September 18, 2009 11:22 PM PDT

others are amused by jingling?

Collapse -
Creating the agenda? well, right here too
by Steven Haninger / September 18, 2009 7:47 PM PDT

where this article says "Fox News is under fire...", nowhere do I see where they report who's doing the shooting. I guess, if they say it's so, it must be so. Wink

Collapse -
RE: who's doing the shooting.
by JP Bill / September 18, 2009 8:22 PM PDT

CNN's coverage also included numerous live reports and interviews

ABC rally story was featured on the network's morning shows, nightly news broadcast

MSNBC also pointed to its own reporting

CBS detailed its coverage of the event

"CBS News had multiple crews on site

And CNN criticized Fox for its inaccurate statement

Collapse -
Maybe should have added
by Steven Haninger / September 18, 2009 8:53 PM PDT

"other than themselves". It would seem to me that torching a building and sending reporters to cover the fire doesn't count as a story any more than that of the bickering that occurs among news agencies themselves.

Collapse -
didn't the other networks point out their coverage?
by JP Bill / September 18, 2009 9:17 PM PDT

and issue statements?

Do they normally do that, unless it is a response to someones (FOX) complaints?

Collapse -
Doesn't really matter who in the news network
by Steven Haninger / September 18, 2009 9:21 PM PDT

It's as Grim asks, "News creating the agenda?". The answer is "Yes".

Collapse -
There are some posting on this forum
by JP Bill / September 18, 2009 11:18 PM PDT

saying that some networks/msm don't report, so it's not just the media talking about themselves.

It's people on forums/blogs and FOX saying the media isn't reporting the stuff they want to hear.

They should watch FOX all the time, they'll heareverything they want to hear, when they want to hear it, ALL DAY LONG.

And they'll also hear what the other guy isn't reporting. That's easier than watching the other guy and finding what they are and aren't saying, and making your own mind up.

Collapse -
But this kind of ad must be recognized for what it is...
by grimgraphix / September 19, 2009 12:33 AM PDT

How many times have we seen the same tactic used on this forum, only phrased as "where is the outrage"? It is clearly begging the question... designed to gather attention for the person's agenda - or in this case, the news channel.

"Where is the outrage" converted to "where is the coverage"? The assumption presented us is that first, it is the most important story, and second, that Fox was the only network savvy enough to recognize the fact and give the story it's due coverage. But as we all know, Fox is never satisfied to just report a story, it editorializes the story... not that the other 24 hour "news" channels don't do the same.

A few weeks ago, I mentioned I had turned to the network channels for the most level headed reporting (well, them and the BBC America). I mention this with a melancholy because I read an editorial a few days ago prognosticating the nearing demise of the network evening news shows. The sad fact is that people don't want objective news reporting... they want news coverage that enforces their opinion. Rupert Murdoch discovered this long ago in Europe, and has brought his colorful journalism style (dare I say "yellow"?) to the American shores.

Collapse -
"But as we all know..."
by EdHannigan / September 19, 2009 2:15 AM PDT

No, WE don't all know that, YOU "know" that. I dispute it. It's an ad; get over it. They had a point to make which you apparently didn't get. That's all.

If you think the network evening news shows feature objective reporting, you are living on another planet.

Collapse -
And YOU know what YOU know
by JP Bill / September 19, 2009 2:34 AM PDT

Can others dispute it?

Will you get over it?

Stay tuned tomorrow for the next episode. (or maybe later on today)

Collapse -
Being a BBC America fan myself, I agree
by Angeline Booher / September 19, 2009 2:40 AM PDT

In addition, BBC has coverage of world events we never hear about.

The evening network news shows have just 30 minutes minus the times for ads, while the cable ones have 24 hours minus the ad time.

I like the C-SPAN channels for seeing and hearing events first hand.

Cable news might be akin to newspapers in that they follow the "editorial policy" of the head honcho(s). And I will admit that sometimes the effort to present both sides of issues is wearing because of some of the people that are invited to present opposing views. Happy

I also agree we are prone to chose those with whom we agree.

Angeline
Speakeasy Moderator

Collapse -
They may have 30 minutes...
by J. Vega / September 19, 2009 3:39 AM PDT

The broadcast networks may have just 30 minutes for their newscast, But I would think that a story like the Senate voting to de-fund ACORN by a vote of 83-7 would be worthy of coverage.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

CNET FORUMS TOP DISCUSSION

Help, my PC with Windows 10 won't shut down properly

Since upgrading to Windows 10 my computer won't shut down properly. I use the menu button shutdown and the screen goes blank, but the system does not fully shut down. The only way to get it to shut down is to hold the physical power button down till it shuts down. Any suggestions?