Question

How to: set up immediate alert when any change in website

I am really not sure what I am even asking! I have no experience in this and so I am looking for maybe some starting off advice so I can further expand my query. I work for a company who allocate work on a workflow system (it's not a mainstream thing, it's been designed in-house by their team). I need to be notified immediately when work is available for me as their system seems sluggish and it can take a while for an alert to be sent through to me. I need to keep things moving along and so I wanted to find out if there was any way I could set up my own alert so that whenever there is a change (i.e. new work added in this case as the rest of the site seems fairly static) I would immediately get some sort of an alert. Is there any way I can set something like this up for myself? I am sure there will be but like I say, I don't know any kind of terminology or anatomy of what I am asking for so any kind of starting off advice or even recommendations would be really appreciated!

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Answer
Re: alert

It's easy to write a program that looks at a certain webpage every 5 minutes or so and tells you if it's not the same as it was the previous time.

If you feel this is beyond your own competencies find someone to do it for you.

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alert

I am happy to have a go at this myself - where can I find information on how to do this?

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Re: information

A programming course in Java or C# should do the trick. Once you know the basics you can find out how to connect to a website, do a get request, compare the result and send a mail or so if it's changed.

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alert
Laugh For someone who isn't versed in Java or C# is there any fast-track way - via a tutorial or other such how-to reference article, etc. - where I can find the information to do this without having to learn everything from scratch?

Or even another method entirely?
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Re: alert
https://www.google.com/search?q=alert+changes+in+website tells about other ways. Many are a paid service, it seems, and you might find a daily report not frequent enough. But you certainly have something to study.

When you found a good way (might take some time) can you tell here what you chose and why?

Post was last edited on October 8, 2019 5:52 AM PDT

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alert

Thanks for this - yep, daily reports are not ideal, it would be great to have some sort of alert as soon as any changes take place - there could be several in a day.

Would there be anyone/anywhere I could ask/could refer to that could teach me Java or C# to fast-track me to learn how to do what I want to do?

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Re: alert

I looked at a few, and some seemed to be more frequent. But I leave it to you to evaluate all.

The elementary Java course I was involved with on a university was about 100 study hours. I doubt if it was enough to do what you want to do. I wouldn't call it fast-track.

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Nod to PYTHON.
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Nod to PYTHON

Apologies that I didn't mention this before, but in my haste to find an answer, I forgot to mention the website page I wish to monitor is password protected. Is there a way round this? Or is that irrelevant?

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Re: password

For a ready-made service or program, it's not sure if it works or not. Just try.

For a program you write yourself it's a certainly a complication.

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Relevant.

Now add that to the google search.

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