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Question

How should I extend my HDMI?

by Soloflyer12 / August 9, 2013 3:11 AM PDT

Hello, I currently have one TV in my basement and I have my receiver upstairs. Now I have a connection from Coax cable from my receiver to a splitter to my tv. Now the Coax cable works but it doesn't look very good. I want to use HDMI through my house and i can fish the cable through to my basement but it's going to be around 75 to 100 feet of cable. Will the signal get degraded like this?

My other option is to use an hdmi over ethernet cable. I will have the same distance of cable but it will be ethernet. I would have one powered transmitter that pulls from my receiver upstairs and through Cat5 would go into my basement to the tv via the other end of the hdmi cat5 adapter. Is this a good idea, and is the Cat5 cable going to be able to maintain the 1080p resolution?

My third option is to use 2 long hdmi cables and have an hdmi booster in there somewhere. So instead of buying one 100 foot cable i would by 2 50 foot cables and plug one into my receiver upstairs then into the booster then the other cable would connect to the other end of the booster and then into my tv.

I am wary on price but also on quality of picture and ease of installation. If there are any other ideas that anyone has they would be of great help. And i can't move my receiver, so moving it to the basement is not an option.

On a side note I already have another tv connected to my receiver HDMI and my receiver only has one port. I was originally just going to use Component for that tv but could i split the hdmi cable over two female ports and plug it into my upstairs and downstairs tv, or would that result in signal loss?

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All Answers

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Answer
Signal loss? On digital? How does that happen?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 9, 2013 3:21 AM PDT

Sorry but if the signal is digital I'm guessing you are thinking of how analog degrades but in HDMI, the signal is digital and either makes it or does not.

But given the story I would not do this. I'd get a receiver where it's needed. Personally I have a 36 foot HDMI cable and it's all good. At 75 to 100 feet you begin to worry but why not use Amazon.com Prime, order up a cable long enough and try it? Prime items are easy to return.

Also, arrange for the electrician to check out the power plugs for proper wiring because if the plugs have hot and neutral swapped there is a chance of sparks or worse.

Again, I would not do this.
Bob

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Answer
The other issue. Splitting HDMI.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 9, 2013 3:27 AM PDT

Given that HDMI has HDCP this means very limited reasons to have such a distance from the receiver to the HDMI TV.

I find that once folk dive into this, they promptly move the receiver.
Bob

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Answer
Something not very clear in my mind.
by Oldartq / August 9, 2013 4:19 AM PDT

You have one tv, one receiver (what kind of receiver?). Why is the receiver separated from the tv or are we just talking about a radio receiver? And the coax cable, is that from the cable company or is that an outside antenna?

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Answers
by Soloflyer12 / August 9, 2013 7:35 AM PDT

I have 2 receivers and one dvr that can record. One receiver is upstairs in my house and i mean upstairs upstairs so it would be even farther to connect to. Then i have another receiver, the one I was talking about, it is connected to one Sony TV and one Vizio TV. The Sony TV is my main TV and it is completely hooked up with the receiver via hdmi as well. My main receiver is right next to my Sony TV because that is my main tv. The Coax cable i am using was actually just a white coax cable I found already running though my ducts from the previous owner. One end of the coax cable was in my crawl space where there was a splitter with signal and the other end was in a closet next to my tv and thought why not just use this one. My receiver is the default one Dish gave me.
And if i were to buy another receiver how hard would it be to setup? I have a closet next to my tv and i could connect it to the tv pretty easily, but what about other wires. I don't think I have any cat5 wall plugs in the closet, would i need it? And also would buying just a receiver affect my monthly bill, I don't see why it would but I know companies are always trying to charge you, I'll ask dish my self too.

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Now I confuse about something else.
by Oldartq / August 9, 2013 3:29 PM PDT
In reply to: Answers

You mention buying another receiver and setting it up yourself? Is Dish suppose do all this for you? I know Directv do all these (up to 4 room) free. However, they do charge you x-amount per month for box rental. So why not talk with them and see what they have to say. If you could buy or rent, then you weight the two, see which is best for you. Good luck.

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One of my questions answered here
by netsiu / August 17, 2013 1:02 AM PDT
In reply to: Answers

With one receiver I was wondering if just antenna but you say Dish, soooo now my question.
On satellite and cable services isn't channel selection done at the receiver? If so how can the second tv watch different programs from the main tv?
Sounds like you need a third receiver anyway.
I use antenna my brother Satellite/Cable. He has in the past bought his own receiver. It was cheaper than Direct TVs.

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Answer
Coaxial options
by mjd420nova / August 9, 2013 12:24 PM PDT

One possible approach would be to use the coaxial output from the rcvr(ch3) if available and would handle the HD easily if the rcvr decodes it. 100 feet would be easy for coax if it has no splices, otherwise a cheap booster would allow you to feed one set and another with the HDMI.

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Cheap booster?
by Soloflyer12 / August 9, 2013 10:59 PM PDT
In reply to: Coaxial options

When you say cheap do you mean like a powered one or just one that simply you plug into the hdmi cable. And the booster is that going to be a hdmi over cat5 booster or just a hdmi booster that uses all hdmi? How about something like this?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Speed-Digital-30-Meters-100Ft-Hdmi-24k-Gold-Sealed-Connector-Cable-100-FT-/161050180339?pt=US_Video_Cables_Adapters&hash=item257f56baf3

It's just a cable but it looks like it's one of those setups with cat 5 cables on the inside because why else would it need to clarify input and output, correct?
And if i did a booster would something like this work?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/130FT-40M-1080P-1-65G-bps-Mini-HDMI-Signal-Repeater-Extender-Amplifier-Booster-/370772643790?pt=US_Video_Cables_Adapters&hash=item5653c58fce
And if I did that would you tell me to buy two 50 feet cables and connect them through there or like one 100 foot cable and one 1 foot cable and put the booster like right there.

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Signal-repeater-extender-amplifier-booster?
by Oldartq / August 9, 2013 11:52 PM PDT
In reply to: Cheap booster?

Sounds like a snake-oil salesmen to me. What the H....are they talking about. How can they do this without any external power...picking it off of thin air (to do it right, they should leave the amplifier-booster part out)..and all for 10 bucks? I can't make any comments about the cable...but in back of my mind it says BEWARE!

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Ok...
by Soloflyer12 / August 10, 2013 12:42 AM PDT
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Don't expect much for $20
by Pepe7 / August 15, 2013 5:19 AM PDT
In reply to: Ok...

I normally stay away from fleabay for such lower priced items that relate to requiring a reliable high bandwidth connection.

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Boosters and cables
by netsiu / August 17, 2013 1:13 AM PDT
In reply to: Cheap booster?

What your showing is Ebay. Scary.
Go back to R. profit's post. Digital signal. Unless the cable is bad 100ft should pose no problem.

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For 720p and 1080i content, yes. Usually.
by Pepe7 / August 19, 2013 5:51 AM PDT
In reply to: Boosters and cables

But if you are trying to pass along higher quality/higher bandwidth 1080p content, you would be surprised at how distance can make a difference sometimes. Been there, done that.

It's important to distinguish among different scenarios being presented to the OP in these threads, who quite often are not as fluent over what's involved both in the 'how to' portion of these discussions, and also the technologies involved behind the scenes.

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Confused
by Soloflyer12 / August 20, 2013 1:20 PM PDT

So I have one person saying that a 100 foot cable should make it and another saying it could degrade. I have done some research about this and I am still not sure. I mean can HDMI decrease in quality or is it all or nothing. Because if it's all or nothing then i'm thinking how can anyone sell a 100 foot hdmi cable that doesn't function at all.

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Confused
by Soloflyer12 / August 20, 2013 1:28 PM PDT

Ok one person is telling me that it's either all or nothing. Then you are telling me that it can degrade. What i'm thinking is how can anyone even sell a 100 foot cable and then have it not work. I mean it even has a return policy of 30 days. Plus it has sold over 150 cables and the seller is rated as a top seller last time I checked. I personally trust eBay as a reliable source but this sort of seems like a risk. Are there any other suggestions before I spend my money?

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Sorry
by Soloflyer12 / August 20, 2013 1:29 PM PDT
In reply to: Confused

Sorry about the double post, my internet kind of froze and I wasn't sure if it went through so I just submitted another post.

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Wire Degrade
by netsiu / August 20, 2013 2:06 PM PDT
In reply to: Confused

Soloflyer, all cable degrades with distance (length equals resistance). What most are saying is that with quality cable and HDMI being digital that 100' is no where near long enough to cause noticeable loss.

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It's always trial and error
by Pepe7 / August 21, 2013 6:44 AM PDT
In reply to: Wire Degrade

Based on your first sentence indicating the physics involved, there's always going to be some degree of trial and error. Even if it doesn't sound like the OP is pushing around the highest definition content (1080p +) over the distance, you would be surprised at sometimes what you get (or more importantly, do not get) at the other end.

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Let me hand you the fire hose.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 21, 2013 6:50 AM PDT
In reply to: Wire Degrade
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=hdmi+clock+recovery

In short, HDMI uses a clock recovery system which is why it does so well at longer lengths than we expected. It's also the reason that your everyday 10 and less foot cables are for all intent all the same.

While there may be a few carp cables on the market, a new cable of the latest spec has always worked for us.
Bob
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Answer
Powered splitter plus HDMI cable or HDMI over Cat5
by Bob_Meyer / August 16, 2013 2:16 PM PDT

I have built a couple of HDMI networks at my church using both long HDMI cables and HDMI over Ethernet. I have had success with powered splitters. I usually use a 4x splitter, because the typical configuration I have to support is one projector and one or two flat screen TVs. It sounds like you only need a 2x splitter, one for each TV.

For the leg to the basement you could use a 100' HDMI cable. Make sure you buy a long enough cable, because you can't really splice or shorten an HDMI cable. I like the BlueRigger cables from Amazon.com.

Or you could use HDMI over Cat5. I use a powered adapter like the Sabrent extender from Amazon. You have to run two Cat5 cables to carry the HDMI signals. You can run up to about 200' that way. And that way, you don't have to worry about breaking HDMI cable ends. I have a really nice 100' HDMI cable with one broken connector. I replaced it with an HDMI over Cat5 run.

Good luck,
Bob

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