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How long before the super rich in the United States begin

by Ziks511 / August 2, 2012 8:03 PM PDT

to emulate this Chinese problem.

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/foreigners/2012/08/china_s_wealthy_and_influential_sometimes_hire_body_doubles_to_serve_their_prison_sentences.html

With Toni's revered unlimited wealth, Wealthy criminals, particularly of the business sort like that Enron creep who died, could begin emulating this new avoidance of criminal liability.

So Toni, I challenge you. Make a believable case that it can't happen here. How, with the liberty allowed the white collar criminal before incarceration, could you prevent the use of substitutes, being paid $100,000 to $1,000,000 a year to sit in prison for some billionaire. I'm surprised the Mafia hasn't come up with this wrinkle.

"In May 2009, a wealthy 20-year-old was drag racing through the city streets of Hangzhou, China, when his Mitsubishi struck and killed a pedestrian in a crosswalk. The car was traveling so fast that the victim—a 25-year-old telecom engineer of a modest, rural background—was flung at least 20 yards. Afterward, bystanders and reporters photographed the driver, Hu Bin, as well as his rich friends, who nonchalantly smoked cigarettes and laughed while waiting for the police to arrive at the scene.

"These images, soon posted online, provoked a public outcry. Anger over the callous behavior of these wealthy Chinese youths was followed by accusations of a police cover-up. First, the local authorities admitted that they had underestimated the speed Hu's vehicle was traveling by half. (Incredibly, the police had first suggested that Hu was going no more than 43 mph.) Public furor rose again when Hu received a three-year prison sentence, an exceptionally light punishment in a country where drunk drivers guilty of similar accidents can receive the death penalty.

"But the most stunning allegation was that the man appearing in court and serving the three-year sentence wasn't Hu at all, but a hired body double.t

"The charge isn't as far-fetched as it may sound. The practice of hiring "body doubles" or "stand-ins" is well-documented by official Chinese media. In 2009, a hospital president who caused a deadly traffic accident hired an employee's father to "confess" and serve as his stand-in. A company chairman is currently charged with allegedly arranging criminal substitutes for the executives of two other companies. In another case, after hitting and killing a motorcyclist, a man driving without a license hired a substitute for roughly $8,000."

Then again, perhaps all Chinese look alike to one another.

Rob

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