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how do i know if my pc is too hot?/////////

by sectornine / August 3, 2006 7:26 PM PDT

-when my motherboard reaches 60 degrees, is that too hot?


-when my pentium 4 cpu reaches 60 degress, is it too hot?


-when my nvidia geforce 6600 pcie reaches 50 degrees, is that hot?


-if my cpu and motherboard gets too hot, is there some kind of measures that cools down my pc? or does it just blows up when it's hot enough?


please help me with all my questions, thank you

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A little hot
by mopscare42 / August 4, 2006 12:32 AM PDT

60c or 140f is a little hot for the motherboard and cpu, but it is not going to blow up! The components are just not going to last as long as if they where running cooler.
Download the program EVEREST it is free. The best way to find it is to google, Everest home edition. Run it to see what your temps are. If they are high, pull the side case of your computer off and check the temps again in a hour or so and see what the temps are.
I have heard people say that could make it run hotter as that disrupts the air flow, but I don't find that to be true. Try it and see.
As for the video card, I have a PNY 7600gs that runs 60c most of the time and that is well below the temp PNY says is too hot and will start causing problems.

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time to clean
by linkit / August 4, 2006 1:13 AM PDT

If you have had that computer for a while and you haven't cleaned the dust out yet, I suggest you do so.

My P4 3.0C computer dropped about 10

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WARNING - - DON'T breathe the dust...
by skycatcher / August 4, 2006 2:27 AM PDT
In reply to: time to clean

Compressed air is going to blast all the dust into the air (and possibly your eyes), it's best to use a vacuum cleaner with a small nozzle on the end of the tube.

Much of the dust in a computer (and general house dust - especially the mattress on your bed) contains a huge amount of dead skin... and the bugs that eat it... and their droppings (poo...) - we change our skin every 28 days or so but not all in one piece like a snake.

It is very bad to inhale that stuff but please do clean out the PC and all the vents (in and out) regularly. If it still runs hot, get an extra fan to fit the inlet vent inside the PC and this will help to suck more air (and dust) into the areas that need cooling - Make sure it blows in the correct direction... if your power supply (PSU) fan blows OUT, the extra fan must blow in - and vice-versa. As Linkit has already said, remove the CPU fan to get at the cooling fins (put it back on the same way it came off...!!). A pastry brush, from a cooking shop, makes a brilliant job of cleaning fins and is an excellent addition to any PC toolkit... but don't borrow one from your wife... she'll kill you if she finds out what you've used it for.

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WARNING- - DO NOT USE A VACUUM CLEANER
by kegizsftzp / August 4, 2006 2:13 PM PDT

I've read somewhere on some website that using a vacuum cleaner creates a huge amount of static electricity which is obviously deadly for your computer. So stay far away from that and just use a can of compressed air and nothing else. If I can find that website that warned the use of a vacuum cleaner I will post it here later.

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I would love to see that article...
by skycatcher / August 4, 2006 9:49 PM PDT

Static can be caused by fast moving air passing over a surface - not the actual vacuum cleaner machine itself. That's how aeroplanes get charged up when they are flying and it is also how lightening is formed in large Cumulonimbus clouds. Even if the vacuum cleaner was charging up the air, that air is blowing OUT into your room, not INTO the PC where the the air is actually coming FROM.

I would imagine that any type of compressed air moves much faster than the air flow created by a vacuum cleaner. If you leave the power cable plugged into both your PC and the wall socket (but with the PC switched off of course) then the whole PC will still be earthed out to prevent the build-up of static. That's why we wear earthing straps when working on PCs or leave the power cable in and touch the metal frame before touching anything else.

Thanks for bringing this subject up anyway, it would be very interesting to examine all information available for future reference as computer components get more sensitive.

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Google is your friend
by linkit / August 5, 2006 3:25 AM PDT

Google: vacuum cleaner static electricity computer

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