Computer Help forum

General discussion

How do I change my user access at work?

by tubaguy63 / January 5, 2005 11:57 AM PST

My employer has set all of our access at a far too limited setting. I can't even view many web pages that I need to and can't install a single program or component. When I try to it says to log in as an admin.

Is there any way I can change my access level to an admin level without my employer knowing?

Thanks in advance!

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: How do I change my user access at work?
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: How do I change my user access at work?
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
No.
by Kees Bakker / January 5, 2005 7:24 PM PST

Only an admin can change the level of other users. Non-admin users can't 'promote' themselves. That's the way it works, or the whole mechanism would be meaningless.

Kees

Collapse -
Simple
by Yew / January 5, 2005 9:17 PM PST

You just walk down to the IT department, and ask them nicely if they would give you administrative rights. Once they've picked themselves up off the floor and composed themselves from the laughing fit you brought on, go back to your desk feeling appropriately stupid, and try getting back to work.

You ever been in the position where you have to fix someone else's stupid mistakes? Well, that's how the people in the IT department feel. If you screw up your system, they have to come around and fix it. They don't enjoy doing that any more than you would having to do extra work because of another employee's incompetence.

I suppose you could try learning how to hack the system, but it's likely someone in the IT department would find out, and very shortly after the only hacking you'd be doing at that company is fitting your posessions into a cardbord box.

Collapse -
Tubaguy, On A Case By Case Basis...
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / January 6, 2005 4:38 AM PST

...we assign computer privileges to users. Those that require internet access or program installation rights to do their jobs will get it...Those users that only do routine input DON'T. As an example, in the large agency I work for, in my department of 50 employees, except for the IT department which oversees all of the 8-10,000 computers, I am the only one that has full admin privileges. Even then, I only have domain admin privileges for our small domain..Security is the name of the game.

For those users that need increased computer privileges, there needs to be an appropriate rationale for doing so...If you can make the case why YOU need special access rights to do your job correctly, then present your reasons to the appropriate people..They might decide you're right..

But don't expect "everyone" to receive the same treatment unless they can provide a reason for the increased privileges.

Hope this helps.

Grif

Collapse -
I wonder
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / January 6, 2005 6:26 PM PST
Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

CNET FORUMS TOP DISCUSSION

Help, my PC with Windows 10 won't shut down properly

Since upgrading to Windows 10 my computer won't shut down properly. I use the menu button shutdown and the screen goes blank, but the system does not fully shut down. The only way to get it to shut down is to hold the physical power button down till it shuts down. Any suggestions?