General discussion

Help...Need good, free file/folder compression program

The title says it, although I want to be able to do high compression on regular files/folders like .txt, .docs, .pdf, and regular folders you'd see on the Windows desktop that a person keeps things in like a folder full of images, for example. In other words, I do not want to make archives like zips, tars, etc. just the other stuff I mentioned.

Are there any programs that can do this? How about 7zip?

The reason I want this is I'd like to be able to compress as much as I can on Windows, compression better than Windows default can deliver, so I can not use as much space as I do now. I have a lot of folders with lots of pics in them etc and pdf's which are quick huge and a few .txt files like this too. This is the stuff I want to be able to compress, if possible.

Any ideas?

Discussion is locked

Follow
Reply to: Help...Need good, free file/folder compression program
PLEASE NOTE: Do not post advertisements, offensive materials, profanity, or personal attacks. Please remember to be considerate of other members. If you are new to the CNET Forums, please read our CNET Forums FAQ. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Reporting: Help...Need good, free file/folder compression program
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Comments
- Collapse -
I use what Windows came with.

Windows native compression is what I use. From XP to 7 it's native and has turned out to be safe and free too.
Bob

- Collapse -
Powerarchiver Free
- Collapse -
PowerArchiver will compress into archive files ...

which is NOT what he wants.

Like Bob, I recommend that he stick with the Native OS compression which is accesses through the file or folder properties.

CNET Forums

Forum Info