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Healthy people cost governments more, study finds - WTH...

by shawnlin / February 5, 2008 11:30 AM PST
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18711498

Excerpt:
*****
There are a lot of good reasons for people to lose weight and stop smoking ? but saving money on lifetime health care costs isn't one of them, according to a study out of the Netherlands.
*****

....Wow - ...I mean, what the heck!?!?!
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Surprising
by Dan McC / February 5, 2008 11:34 AM PST

But it makes sense when you read the reasons.

Go figure.

Dan

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Not at all surprising ...
by Bill Osler / February 5, 2008 6:56 PM PST
In reply to: Surprising

I haven't seen similar data for obesity in the past, but the fact that smokers cost less over a lifetime is old news.

Money for preventive medical care may make sense because we value longer healthier lives but providing that care rarely costs less over the long term. For the most part the people who are trying to sell aggressive preventive medical care as a cost saving strategy are quite clueless about how the economics actually work.

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They sell it until
by Dan McC / February 7, 2008 11:01 PM PST

you're off their insurance and on to Medicare.

Dan

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but in holland
by WOODS-HICK / February 5, 2008 11:55 AM PST

national health care is provided. so is euthanasia.

you do the math. Happy

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(NT) yeah...it isn't as comprehensive a study as it could be...
by shawnlin / February 5, 2008 10:11 PM PST
In reply to: but in holland
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OK, let's do the math
by Dango517 / February 6, 2008 3:15 AM PST
In reply to: but in holland

smoker retires at 63, dead at 64 from cancer, cost $100,000.00

Non-smoker retires at 63, dies at 76 (median age), cost of Social Security $25,000/year x 12 years equals $300,000.00. This is not including treatment for chronic illnesses that comes with old age or any extended stay visits to the hospital or costs for ordinary health care.

Why is this important? Because cost is being used as a political lever to pressure/force those with addictions to change there ways. In other words, "Your addictions are costing use money so you have to change, if you can't we'll force you to change to save us money". Yet, in reality they cost you less because they die younger.

This makes this argument propaganda.

Propaganda:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propaganda

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The argument is simpler than that.
by James Denison / February 6, 2008 7:00 AM PST
In reply to: OK, let's do the math

"We believe that health and safety matters impart to us a moral right to deprive others of theirs".

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Maybe I should review the Constitution again
by Dango517 / February 6, 2008 3:42 PM PST
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About post 8
by Dango517 / February 6, 2008 3:49 PM PST

when you read those parts about personal liberty and individual rights in the Constitution, just ignore them, most do. They must of been used for filler maybe they needed a few more words to make it look nice on the page.

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Just like the rationalization to
by Dan McC / February 7, 2008 11:19 PM PST

deprive people of their right to be free of unwarranted search and seizure.

Dan

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(NT) How does the average person get $25,000/year?
by Diana Forum moderator / February 6, 2008 12:04 PM PST
In reply to: OK, let's do the math
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Deduct as much as you believe is needed from this
by Dango517 / February 6, 2008 12:46 PM PST

From post 6 >> "...........treatment for chronic illnesses that comes with old age or any extended stay visits to the hospital or costs for ordinary health care." That was not included in the $300,000.00.

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I found this
by Dango517 / February 6, 2008 4:15 PM PST

note PIA below chart, paragraph two.

http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/ProgData/retirebenefit2.html

The resulting income would be $1,768.00x12=$21,216.00/year/person. This certainly is a complicated subject with many factors. I'll stick with the $24,00.00 I used above. There might be some COLA benefits as will.

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A cure all?
by Bob__B / February 6, 2008 5:33 AM PST

Let's say smokes are free.
People smoke their brains out and die young.

The result:
Population control.
Lower health care cost.
Less pollution.
Less need for food.
Less need for water.
Less need for petro.
Less need for......everything.

Seems like a simple fix.
Is it possible our all knowing politicians have this backwards?

Someone made a statement that went something like.
"What this world needs is a good plague"....perhaps they were right.

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said in true...
by James Denison / February 6, 2008 6:00 AM PST
In reply to: A cure all?

Hitleresque fashion. He would have loved it.

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Maybe this guy comes to mind
by Dango517 / February 6, 2008 12:57 PM PST
In reply to: said in true...
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We have one already
by Dango517 / February 6, 2008 12:41 PM PST
In reply to: A cure all?
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