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Healthy Inflation Based on Numismatics?

Amazing amount of money locked up in coin collecting, and it's not even precious metal either.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seignorage
The "50 State" series of quarters (25-cent coins) was launched in the U.S. in 1999. The U.S. government planned on a large number of people collecting each new quarter as it rolled out of the U.S. Mint, thus taking the pieces out of circulation[citation needed]. Approximately 147 million people are collecting the coins.[3] Each set of 50 quarters is worth $12.50. Since it costs the Mint about five cents for each 25-cent piece it produces, the government made a profit whenever someone "bought" a coin and chose not to spend it.[4] The U.S. Treasury estimates that it has earned about US$6.3 billion in seigniorage from the quarters over the course of the entire program.[5]

In some cases, national mints report the amount of seigniorage provided to their respective governments; for example, the Royal Canadian Mint reported that in 2006 it generated $C93 million in seigniorage for the Government of Canada.[6] The US government, the largest beneficiary of seignorage, earned approximately $25 billion annually as of 2000.[7]

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