Question

HDD+SSD system with disk encryption

Feb 9, 2016 5:30PM PST

Hello Everyone!

I have two disks in my laptop: an HDD (1TB, 7.2k rpm) and an SSD (240GB).
I'm using this machine for both work and gaming. Fearing of theft, I surely want to encrypt my data with TrueCrypt/VeraCrypt/etc. Of course I don't want to encrypt games, downloads, installed program files (as these are publicly available to anyone), but program data (like web cookies, my project files), documents, etc should be encrypted.

I'm looking forward to hear some ideas, what would be the best way to setup my system:
1) Windows and work on encrypted SSD, program files, games, downloads on HDD
2) Windows and work on encrypted HDD, program files, games, downloads on SSD
3) Also looking for other ideas about different partitioning and encrypting (*)

(*) Here I'm thinking about more complex solutions, for example use SSD for Windows, but separate a 240GB partition on the HDD for mirroring the SSD contents there, and I still can use the remaining HDD. But I don't know how this would effect performance.

I really can't decide. The fast, SSD based system sounds awesome, but I'm a bit afraid of SSDs because my previous, unlucky experiences I had with computer storages. As long as I know, if a HDD fails, most of the time there are good chances to get your data back, but if an SSD dies, it's an other story.

Waiting for your ideas, experiences, comments.

Thank you!

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Answer
Backups should not be encrypted.
Feb 9, 2016 5:50PM PST

There are so many prior posts where folk encrypted and had no backups. And it's true that data recovery on SSD is more unlikely so again why we backup.

-> I read your post a second time and it sounds as if you want to rely on data recovery rather than backups.

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Backups prior to recovery
Feb 10, 2016 1:56AM PST

You are right, I approached it the wrong way. It sounds like I'm relying on recovery because of my previous bad experiences, and the first thing that comes into my mind is failing if I see a hdd/ssd. But if I get used to regular backups, should option 1 be the better choice?

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My solution today
Feb 10, 2016 9:22AM PST

Is a single SSD. Why? Here the price of 512GB SSDs plummeted to 120 bucks (sale, have seen this many times now) so we're ditching HDDs since that would add cost and complexity.

Your choice on encryption or not but here, nope. My past experiences with encryption is 99.99% the owner did not backup. And didn't backup the bitlocker certificate and they expect recovery. For those we bow out and send them to drivesavers.com. You can guess my view is the encryption for everyone is not a good idea.

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Well..
Feb 10, 2016 2:02PM PST

Unfortunately this wasn't a "what should I buy", but a "what should I do with what I have" type of question, but thank you for taking time and answering to me, I will consider selling both (as I haven't used them yet), and buying a 512Gb SSD.

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What I would do?
Feb 10, 2016 2:20PM PST

Is to not encrypt. That's my choice and yes I keep my stuff backed up but the certificate I would have to keep on the dozen machines plus at the office would be insane. So for me, not happening.

You have choices, so what fits your needs is your choice.

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