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Question

hacked again, what to do?

by cathy246 / October 22, 2011 1:05 AM PDT

I just found out my email has been hacked. This is the second time. The first time was a year and a half ago and the installed McAfee system did not seem to have stopped it. I have downloaded, again the AVG free program for my desktop, as it vanished. I believe AVG is on my laptop.

What can be done to protect my phone, a Samsung epic? Can I do anything more to prevent hacking? I do not go to iffy websites, etc, I am scanning the desktop now with AVG, as I believe the desktop is the source of the problem. Is there anything else that should be done? The hacker sent mass 'stop smoking now' emails which then direct the user to a porn sight.

Thank you for any help with this
Cathy

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All Answers

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Answer
Re: hacked email
by Kees_B Forum moderator / October 22, 2011 1:27 AM PDT

Was that sending done from your PC or from elsewhere? Webbased or via smtp?
Was that mail sent from your email account or were they just using your email address? Nothing easier than spoofing, you don't even have to know the password.

Kees

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where email was hacked
by cathy246 / October 24, 2011 3:18 PM PDT
In reply to: Re: hacked email

Thanks for your questions. I am not sure where the email was hacked. I have a desktop, a netbook and a cellphone with email. I suspect it was thedesktop, because the same thing happened around a year and a half ago, and the desktop also got infected with a virus that significantly impacted internet use. The desktop has macafee on it, which did not stop the hacking/virus last time. The netbook has malware on it, and the cellphone has nothing. Suggestions? I do not want this to happen again! I changed my password but perhaps that doesn't help?

Thanks,

Cathy

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What Kees was asking with
by roddy32 / October 25, 2011 12:56 AM PDT
In reply to: where email was hacked

his question "Webbased or via smtp? ". He is asking you what your email program is. Is it computer based such as Outlook, Outlook Express, Thunderbird. etc? Or is it web based suck at Hotmail, Yahoo, etc? If so, which one.

Also what do you mean that "the netbook has malware on it?" Do you mean that you have actual malware such as a virus a trojan, etc? Or are you referring to Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware? That is a great program but is not for viruses. I am assuming that you abbreviated the name of the program and called it just "malware" which makes your statement confusing.

As far as the phone, there are many free antivirus program you can get in the market. Depending on the phone. I have an android and I use Lookout Mobile Security which has a free version. If you have an iphone, I'm sure they are antivirus program available for them also.

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hacked
by Rockij / October 28, 2011 12:25 PM PDT
In reply to: where email was hacked

Strongly recommeded that you change your password every 70 days and make it more secure. The hacking will stop.

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Answer
What to do..
by Carol~ Forum moderator / October 25, 2011 7:31 AM PDT

Cathy..

In addition to this recent post, I also read of your experience last April. Between the two, you asked if there were any ways of protecting yourself . You never did mention the type of email account it was, but the below should give you a general idea, of things to be aware of. Especially take note of the first article. I hold his opinion (and knowledge) in the highest regard, and think it's worth "a read".

From Brian Krebs: After Epsilon: Avoiding Phishing Scams & Malware

About E-mail spoofing from Symantec : FAQ: Spoof email

From CNET's Community Newsletter Q&A:

"How to recognize and avoid phishing scams ". See Miguel K's "winning answer". There's much to be gained by reading the entire thread.

This may (or may not) apply, depending on your specific circumstances: Recent reports of Account hijacks

Important Security Information To Know

Best of luck..
Carol

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Answer
sounds like spam
by hellocomputer / October 28, 2011 4:18 PM PDT

It just sounds like you received some spam. If your email is hacked, your friends will be receiving spam from you.

If you click on any link inside the spam email, the sender will know you received his spam, and will send you more spam in the future. If the email is a html email (contains pictures), just reading the email is enough to let the sender know you read the email.

One way to deal with spam is to use disposable email addresses. Basically you give a different email address to each business or groups of friends you deal with. When you receive spam, you will know who sold you out. Then all you have to do is turn off or delete that particular email address.

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Answer
public exposure
by porsche10x / October 29, 2011 10:52 PM PDT

Do you ever check your email at unsecured public wi-fi hotspots? Have you recently accessed your email on a public computer, say, through complimentary computer access at a hotel or something? Either one could expose you to having your account compromised. If you do this rarely, but occasionally, you might consider changing your password immediately afterwards.

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