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Freedom of Speech - works two ways

by Del McMullen / July 22, 2004 10:57 AM PDT

A liberal one hour radio talk show was pulled, after about
six weeks on the air, in Silver City, New Mexico.

The show was not purely political. It discussed such topics
as the reintroduction of Gray Wolves into National Forests,
voter registration, holistic medicine, and the economy as
well as the war in Iraq.

The station's owner resisted pulling the show stating that it
is a shame that we can't have someone with an opposing
view. The station runs a lot of conservative programming.

It didn't seem there was any particular topic that spurred the
opponents, but anything that questioned the government's
point of view, or offered criticism of President Bush, "was
enough to light up the phones".

"It wasn't like the show was preaching anarchy" the owner said,
"If you don't like what you hear, push the button. There's a lot
of programming out there".

But when you're a small station, in a small town in mountains,
you might enjoy a captive audience, but ....if the business
depends upon advertising, you must also respect an equally
captive revenue source.

The owner said 20 to 25 advertisers, including banks, auto and
furniture dealers, pizza stores, and ATV dealers, threatened to
pull their spots if the show continued. This represented over
$10,000 a month in ad revenue.

Freedom of speech - works two ways - and money talks.

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Playing Hardball...
by Blake Cook / July 22, 2004 12:54 PM PDT
The owner said 20 to 25 advertisers, including banks, auto and furniture dealers, pizza stores, and ATV dealers, threatened to pull their spots if the show continued. This represented over $10,000 a month in ad revenue.

Freedom of speech - works two ways - and money talks. - Del McMullen


It's too bad that 20-25 advertisers can dictate what the whole community can listen to. It sounds like the radio show was popular too. Sad Perhaps the advertisers should be boycotted to show them that hardball tactics can work both ways...


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Re: Playing Hardball...
by C1ay / July 22, 2004 1:32 PM PDT
In reply to: Playing Hardball...
It's too bad that 20-25 advertisers can dictate what the whole community can listen to. It sounds like the radio show was popular too. Sad Perhaps the advertisers should be boycotted to show them that hardball tactics can work both ways...


They're not dictating what the community can listen to. They are exercising their own free speech by choosing what programming they want to sponsor and which they don't. Would you spend your money to sponsor Rush Limbaugh? He's popular too.

Why would you advocate boycotting them? Do you think they are somehow obligated to support someone else's political view, even if it's not their own? You seem to have a very ***** interpretation of the 1st amendment.



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Power Of The Few...
by Blake Cook / July 22, 2004 2:09 PM PDT
They're not dictating what the community can listen to. They are exercising their own free speech by choosing what programming they want to sponsor and which they don't. Would you spend your money to sponsor Rush Limbaugh? He's popular too. - Clay

If I had a business or product, I would want that business or product to be advertised on all the most popular shows whether I agreed with the content or not. Since the shows are popular, my advertising would reach far more people than if I chose shows that no one listened to, simply because the shows mirrored my political views...

These advertisers are not only shooting themselves in their own feet, but they are dictating what their community can listen to. I totally disagree with the power of the few dictating what the majority can hear...


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Can you tolerate the idea..........
by Del McMullen / July 22, 2004 2:40 PM PDT
In reply to: Power Of The Few...

....that possibly members of the community had approached
the businesses and "suggested" they drop their sponsorship.

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Can you provide the source link???
by Blake Cook / July 22, 2004 2:53 PM PDT
Can you tolerate the idea that possibly members of the community had approached the businesses and "suggested" they drop their sponsorship. - Del McMullen

I didn't read that anywhere in the link you provided. Wait, you didn't provide a link. I guess we only have your word on what was included in the source that you quoted. Is it possible that you're trying to read in too much between the lines of this story? If your hypothesis above isn't included in your link, then it is pure conjecture on your part of the forces behind the advertisers' maneuvers...


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Link, Baloney
by Del McMullen / July 23, 2004 2:44 AM PDT

I only asked a simple question, did not make a statement.

In any event, anyone has the perogative to make any
statement, as outrageous or otherwise, as they may care,
without providing a link to someone else's words.

Some people get along without "parroting" others.

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Re: Power Of The Few...
by C1ay / July 22, 2004 8:56 PM PDT
In reply to: Power Of The Few...
These advertisers are not only shooting themselves in their own feet, but they are dictating what their community can listen to. I totally disagree with the power of the few dictating what the majority can hear...

It has always been the normal course of business for advertisers to pick their spots. Some buy cheap spots in the middle of the night and some buy spots on the Super Bowl. At any rate, it is up to the buyer to pick what he/she wants to sponsor. The media trys to sell spots to support the variety of progarmming they have. Shows that don't get sponsorship, for a variety of reasons, are dropped and new shows come out. Are you now trying to say that someone should DICTATE to the advertisers what they're going to sponsor, whether they like it or not?

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Re: Power Of The Few...
by Paul C / July 22, 2004 11:28 PM PDT
In reply to: Power Of The Few...

A few years ago, Blake, a group of leftist groups (mostly feminist and gay/lesbian groups) tried to organize a boycott of the product of the Florida Orange Juice Council because it at the time advertised on Rush Limbaugh's show. The orange juice producers, perhaps smarting from the whole Anita Bryant fiasco of a few years earlier, caved and pulled their ads.

Do I take it, therefore, that you would have opposed that? I vertainly hope so. My take on boycotts is that very few succeed since there are very few instances in which a company's actions or sponsorship is so outrageous that the boycott has the chance to muster the necessary support to do real economic harm. These days, the real impact of these actions appears to be based on adverse PR and the impact that has on the company in terms of diminished support from those who really had no initial motivation to stop using the product as a result of the original grievance.

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Re: Playing Hardball...
by dirtyrich / July 22, 2004 2:27 PM PDT
In reply to: Playing Hardball...

Where did it say the show was popular? IT didn't. Perhaps the sponsors didn't want to support a failing show and lose their money?

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Lighting Up The Phones...
by Blake Cook / July 22, 2004 2:47 PM PDT
Where did it say the show was popular? IT didn't. - dirtyrich

"Lighting up the phones" usually implies a popular program. If the phones are not ringing, it usually implies that very few are listening and/or there are few who care enough about what is being discussed to contribute their views. I bet Rush's phones are "lit up" too when he's on the air and I bet a great many callers aren't exactly calling to give their support to what he's saying...

This is what Del shared with us in his post:

It didn't seem there was any particular topic that spurred the opponents, but anything that questioned the government's point of view, or offered criticism of President Bush, "was enough to light up the phones".

Perhaps if Del had provided a link, we might have been able to discover some additional useful information that he may have failed to include in his post...


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Re: Lighting Up The Phones... OR...
by Angeline Booher / July 22, 2004 11:40 PM PDT
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Re: Lighting Up The Phones...
by dirtyrich / July 23, 2004 12:27 AM PDT

OR it just had lots of people complaining about it... he's talking about people complaining about the program, not people calling in to be on the air and discuss their views.
Concerning the context of the article and post, one would best assume that the people were complaining about the program, not supporting it.

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Re: Freedom of Speech - works two ways
by David Evans / July 22, 2004 2:59 PM PDT

Whoopie, Ronstadt, Trudeau, and a liberal radio talk show. It's a good start and getting better, keep it goin'!

Real Americans have "freedom of speech" too and it's time real Americans stand up and say "enough!"

Looks like it's finally happening. It's time to open up a BOCOW nationwide, lol.

DE

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Re: Freedom of Speech - works two ways
by Angeline Booher / July 23, 2004 12:05 AM PDT

What I would choose to boycott would not be legitimate media outlets, nor advertisers who supported views with which I do not agree.

What I boycott are retailers, mechanics, providers of various services, proffessional people, and the like with which I have dealt directly, and have not treated me fairly.

I have an OFF button, and there is nothing that can force me to listen to any TV or radio program. I have a choice, and it's my choice. I choose my battles.

That being said, I often do listen to all views. That way I can hear what is being said without somebody telling me what was said, can sometimes learn something new, and can reach informed judgments.

Angeline
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

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(NT) (NT) 3 ways - <Middle>
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / July 22, 2004 3:03 PM PDT
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Re: Link
by Del McMullen / July 23, 2004 2:53 AM PDT
In reply to: Link

Hi Clay,

That wasn't my source, but it mirrors what I picked up elsewhere.

Remember this is small station in a small town. No nationwide
audience.

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A link
by Evie / July 22, 2004 11:29 PM PDT
http://www.thedailypress.com/artman/publish/article_1263.shtml

I like the end how the show had to essentially pay the station to stay on air. My bet is that the station owner's description of the program downplays the true inflammatory nature of the content. A concensus of 20 out of 25 advertisers just doesn't happen for no reason. A radio advertiser chooses where to put their ad dollars not only on the basis of the programming but the reputation of the station as a whole. Apparently RFS was enough of a taint on the reputation of the station that advertisers wouldn't even want to be associated with the station.

Unfortunately there is no mention of ratings.

Evie Happy
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Re: Freedom of Speech - works two ways
by Mary Kay / July 22, 2004 11:37 PM PDT

It'a shame that we can't listen to both sides of an issue and learn something. It's also a shame that we don't allow others to express their opinions.

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