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For Kidpeat. A good book.

by Ziks511 / April 7, 2006 9:18 PM PDT
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/039300578X/sr=8-1/qid=1144494431/ref=sr_1_1/102-6748578-2352134?%5Fencoding=UTF8

The Republic in Peril, 1812. First published by Columbia University in 1964. Still considered a good University level book on the subject. Note all the to-ing and fro-ing by Calhoun and his cohorts beating the war drums, Madison's reluctance and Jefferson's assertion that most of Canada would welcome the Americans as deliverers and that there would be virtually no fighting. Quite a modern assessment in its inaccuracy, and not quite how it played out. The war cost the US 154 million dollars when a million really was a million.

One of the texts I read as an undergrad. It was brand new then, but can in no way be considered revisionist. Its also cheap at $9.99.

Rob
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Henry Steele Commager.
by Ziks511 / April 8, 2006 5:51 PM PDT
http://www.answers.com/topic/henry-steele-commager

Especially The Growth of the American Republic (with Samuel Eliot Morison, New York: Oxford University Press, 1930 [as Oxford History of the United States; 7th ed., 1980.]. Revised and abridged edition with Samuel Eliot Morison and William E. Leuchtenberg published by Oxford University Press in 1980 as Concise History of the American Republic, rev. 1983.

Documents of American History (1934 et al.)
Readings in American History (with Allan Nevins, 1939)

Extremely worthwhile: The American Mind: An Interpretation of American Thought and Character Since the 1880s (1950)

Also crucial: The Empire of Reason: How Europe Imagined and America Realized the Enlightenment (Garden City, NY: Anchor Press / Doubleday, 1977, and later reprintings.)

Commager on Tocqueville (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1993): best discussion of Alexis de Tocqueville, French author and political scholar who travelled extensively in the US in the early 19th Century. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexis_de_Tocqueville
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Incomplete post. Sorry, but it gives me an excuse to write
by Ziks511 / April 8, 2006 6:18 PM PDT
In reply to: Henry Steele Commager.

about the man.

If the owners and moderators of Speakeasy will tolerate, I will post the really great books as I find them. I'm unpacking after 9 years of moving and storage. I will be posting only the monuments of American History, centerists all, and not a nut or a radical or a revisionist in the bunch.

Henry Steele Commager was like the grand old man History himself. We made pilgrimages to Amherst just to hear him speak, to sit at the feet of Colossus, that's just how we felt. To meet him was like meeting Teddy Roosevelt, or Lincoln, or Jefferson in the flesh, an almost magical connection with the best thought the United States could produce. And in his late 70's he could out-think the smartest smartass Doctoral candidate who thought he'd found a new piece of evidence that no one else had noticed. Doctor Commanger had found it, and catalogued it, and could recite it virtually verbatim, and then put it in its place, as a brick in the chimney, or if you were really lucky, and really good, as the framing of the window, out of which he would then describe the view of subsequent events. I could write like this for a week. He was a giant of historical research, historical thought and most particularly, of honesty in evaluating history itself.

They don't make his kind any more.

Rob

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Henry Steele Commager.
by Ziks511 / April 8, 2006 6:00 PM PDT
http://www.answers.com/topic/henry-steele-commager

Especially The Growth of the American Republic (with Samuel Eliot Morison, New York: Oxford University Press, 1930 [as Oxford History of the United States; 7th ed., 1980.]. Revised and abridged edition with Samuel Eliot Morison and William E. Leuchtenberg published by Oxford University Press in 1980 as Concise History of the American Republic, rev. 1983. try for the original 1930 OUP or the 1980 7th ed OUP, as they are unabridged, if a Concise falls in your lap its worth the read. Samuel Eliot Morrison went on to become Dean of Harvard.

Documents of American History (1934 et al.)
Readings in American History (with Allan Nevins, 1939)

Extremely worthwhile: The American Mind: An Interpretation of American Thought and Character Since the 1880s (1950)

Also crucial: The Empire of Reason: How Europe Imagined and America Realized the Enlightenment (Garden City, NY: Anchor Press / Doubleday, 1977, and later reprintings.) Very important on how the people then understood and talked about the Revolution and the Birth of the Republic, and as an example of what the peak of the US intellectual establishment of the first half or more of the 20th Century thought.

Commager on Tocqueville (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1993): best discussion of Alexis de Tocqueville, French author and political scholar who travelled extensively in the US in the early 19th Century. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexis_de_Tocqueville

There's not a radical or revisionist in the stack.

Rob
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