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Fertility Tourism?

EU faces fertility tourism threat


EU enlargement could encourage 'fertility tourists' to travel to Eastern Europe for cheap IVF, doctors have warned.

Treatment in countries such as Hungary and Slovenia costs around 2,400 euros (
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Re: Fertility Tourism?

In reply to: Fertility Tourism?

Remember when everyone went to the Soviet Union for laser eye surgery?

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Re: Fertility Tourism?

In reply to: Re: Fertility Tourism?

Don't recall that one, but it wouldn't surprise me. Seeking some elective procedures outside the country would seem to benefit everyone and harm few -- safety concerns aside, but you sign all sorts of waivers for Lasik, dental work, etc. as it is in this country. I was surprised to see that the UK covers one round of IVF and apparently the medical establishment wants three rounds. These expensive treatments are really in the realm of elective procedures. If safe and effective treatment can be obtained in another country, why not? For the additional money, my FIL spent a month in Ukraine and were he still working could also have taken a month off from work w/o pay and still come out ahead! Yes, there are risks, but there always are. Once the "regulators" get a hold of this, nobody benefits.

Evie Happy

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Re: Fertility Tourism?

In reply to: Re: Fertility Tourism?

This sounds like you cant really apply marketplace values on American Medicine. As usual only an "elite" few can get the bargains. What a sad comment this is on our system of supposedly "free enterprise " medicine!

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Re: Fertility Tourism?

In reply to: Fertility Tourism?

what they 'forget' to mention is that with all the eastern block countrie coming into the EU, the introduction of the Euro -as a common currency- will almost certainly erase any benefits that you get today...

it would be interesting to know how much Evies FIL would have paid for the same treatment 15 yrs ago, russian friends have told me that prices in the former USSR have soared....

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Re: Fertility Tourism?

In reply to: Re: Fertility Tourism?

Hi Jonah,

I think for the domestic consumer using local currency -- coupons then hrivna in Ukraine for example -- there has been a lot of inflation. This is due to the black market available to any with foreign currency. Forget exchange rates they are irrelevant -- if $1 = 5 hrivna, that same dollar could buy goods worth 50 hrivna. On this most recent trip, the dentist requested Euros but was still more than happy to see American dollars.

With the fall of the USSR many of these countries had highly skilled professionals that found themselves suddenly devoid of a consumer base. Obviously it is not ideal in the short run for foreign consumers to avail themselves of cheaper services while the majority of locals cannot afford them, but eventually this influx of foreign currency allows these professionals to stay in business and provide some level of service to the local population.

I don't think that in the short run the universal currency will level the playing field of costs. For example the cost in UK includes the costs of the government bureacracy and regulation whereas these are largely absent in Slovenia, etc.

I guess I just don't see this particular issue as a threat as it is called in the BBC piece. The only threat might be to the private health sector in the UK which stands to lose dollars to countries that can apparently provide a similar if not better quality of service for a lower price.

Evie Happy

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