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Dying CPU

Hi everyone
This PC HP Pavilion 6635 Celeron 533 MHz just died .It has Phoenix Bios but it neither beep nor post
When I lifted the heatsink the CPU came out with it (I did not have to lift the lever of the Zif socket) The CPU stick into the heatsink When I scrapped CPU the layer on top of it, where they wrote the name and the rating of the CPU has gone. Then I installed it again to test. To my surprise it worked I setup the Aida32 to measure its temperature. Aida reported 93 .C I tried to install Sandra benchmark to double check but I could not (Win98 SE lack of some upgrad) I took the case out The heatsink seemed a little hot but I am not sure whether its temperature is correct or not I tried to scan the hard drive 10Gig with Spybot it scanned rather slow. The CPU fan has two wire only (old model, there is no third wire to measure RPM). How can AIDA32 measure the RPM?
I tried the Motherboard Monitor 5 program but I got the same temperature. In the Bios there is no option to measure the temperature of CPU or motherboard.
How long this CPU will last? Besides CPU heatsink Fan what else should I buy? Any other attention? (It belongs to my friend?s son)
Thank you for your precious time and advice.
Hpc

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Re: Dying CPU

In reply to: Dying CPU

These programs were not written to work with all machines. One of the behaviours I see today is that people are intolerant of errors that are in such software and PCs in general. There are many bugs in such things. What to do? Your choice.

As to how long things last, the average PC and parts is about a 5 year design. That's a generalization and if unacceptable then you need to buy refrigirators instead that are designed for 7 and up years.

As to the heatsink/fan issue. Such is a electro-mechanical device and will need occasional replacement. What's amazing is that people rarely open the machine and remove the dust bunnies. Then complain bitterly when it overheats and fails.

Bob

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Re: Dying CPU

In reply to: Re: Dying CPU

Dear Mr. R. Proffitt
Thank you for your precious time and advice.
Thank you
hpc

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Re: Dying CPU

In reply to: Re: Dying CPU

Behind that generalization (5 year life expectancy) stand some solid reasons.

First, electro-mechanical devices (pin-ball machines, slot machines, and computers Happy ) all have a 5 year depreciation life according to the IRS rules. From that flows this support requirement, the Manufacturer must have parts available to repair all expected failures for 5 years from LRS (Last Revenue Ship date = the last day they sell one for a profit).

Second. were a company to build a PC to last for 10 years, they would have to double or triple their prices over the competition to break even. (The crucial part is bearings - we can make them to last for >30 years, ala the gyros in the space probes, but you and I can't afford them, only Uncle Sam has that kind of money.) Would YOU buy such a PC, even if you knew it would last that long???

BTW I have a 230MB ide drive still working in my basement. It's too small even to be used as a swap drive for todays PCs. A more recent 1MB drive will barely hold Win98 let alone it's applications.

For the foreseeable future, a technology refresh cycle time of 2-5 years seems almost inevitable. It CAN'T go on forever, after all there ARE limits, but every limit that has been touted as disasterous for the last 15 years, has been circumvented before it even slowed the computer industries rate of progress.

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How long will a hot CPU last?

In reply to: Re: Dying CPU

If it were 93 Celsius it would die within a few minutes
Thank you for your precious time and advice.

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