Computer Help forum

General discussion

DVD - R vs DVD +R

by giyad / July 16, 2006 1:57 AM PDT

Can someone tell me what the difference is between
-R and +R DVD's?. I know +R's write faster than -R's,
is that the only difference.

Steve J.

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: DVD - R vs DVD +R
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: DVD - R vs DVD +R
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
The differences...
by John.Wilkinson / July 16, 2006 2:07 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD - R vs DVD +R

In short, DVD-R is more frequently used for DVD Recorders and accepted by DVD players, but that gap is narrowing. Performance, speed, and reliability are all equal, so the decision on which to choose should be made solely on what DVD player you wish to use them with.

For more detaled information about the various formats, click here.

Hope this helps,
John

Collapse -
For the average person: None
by jnbhoward / July 16, 2006 2:35 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD - R vs DVD +R

So long as your burner accepts either/or, one is pretty much as good as the next to the average person. The more important matter is the quality of the materials used to make the disc, and not all are created equal.

Collapse -
The differences are significant though
by Nidisa / July 20, 2006 10:32 PM PDT

I've found that what matters MOST is whether your stand alone dvd player will PLAY the format. I have 5 dvd stand alone players, and some of them will play -R but not +R, and the others will play +R but not -R. I even have one player that will play some -R but not others, even when they are the exact same manufacturer. This leads to a huge amount of frustration on my part, as I cannot count on being able to play a dvd on every one of my players. If anyone has a solution to *this* problem, I'd appreciate it. Even when I burn dvds at the same speed, I'll still get a player or 2 that won't accept them; even when they are the same format, etc. It's an expensive issue for the consumers, who either waste money buying stack after stack of dvds trying to find one that will play, or buying dvd players that play what they have.

Collapse -
Try setting Book Type
by SilverSfr / July 22, 2006 1:15 PM PDT

Have you tried using a +R and setting the book type to DVD-ROM? This has worked for me on even the picky standalone DVD players.

Collapse -
Defining the differences: technical and functional
by jmagecko / July 21, 2006 3:27 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD - R vs DVD +R

The best way to examine this issue is to review multiple sources. A problem is that depending who you talk to, you get different answers.

A good way to find some reasonable sources is to Google the following search phrase. Quotes and spaces ARE important.

"dvd-r" "dvd+r" differences

Collapse -
DVD-R vs DVD+R
by tigergirl995 / July 21, 2006 6:18 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD - R vs DVD +R

The buzz I'm getting about the two (currently) competing DVD formats is:

DVD+R is actually meant for "real-time" recording. Say you have a video surveillance system, using digital cameras. Chances are the digital video deck uses DVD+R format discs to record the action.

Also, if you are doing computer back-ups to a digital format, then DVD+R allows (so I have heard) better real-time recording.

At this time, there are multi-format, external drives that record using either DVD+R or DVD-R media. A relatively new player in the mix are the dual-layer or double-layer drives, which seem to be more compatible with either media. (Read the specs on the box before making a purchase!) The big thing is that DVD-R seems to be more compatible with table-top DVD players, so if you are burning a disc to view on your home video system, DVD-R might be a better choice. (Again, check your player's specifications.)

The latest member in the alphabet soup of DVD terms is "Blu-Ray." Blu-Ray players are currently quite pricey (about $1,000) and there is a question of their backward compatibility with other existing formats. I have also heard of DVD-R+, which offers over 9 hours recording capability. The best thing to do is search on Google, using "DVD formats" as your search query. Don't be surprised to find a lot of contradicting and confusing information! At the present time, there is no standard format.

Collapse -
HD-DVD too right?
by ackmondual / July 21, 2006 10:49 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD-R vs DVD+R

That's also technically based off DVD or no?

Also, is DVD-R+ is related BR or DVD?

Collapse -
Google Bitsetting and read more...
by Muad Dib / July 22, 2006 2:21 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD - R vs DVD +R

Many DVD burners allow "bitsetting" enabling DVD+R discs to appear as DVD-ROM (disc type - commercial production) discs often providing better compatibility with desktop players.

Collapse -
DVD+R for better results
by bucca / July 22, 2006 7:27 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD - R vs DVD +R

In Australia, we have PC User Magazine which is streets ahead of the rest for product reviews. For the last two years they have frequently hammered out the message DVD-R and DVD+R vary on supplier.
Consistently they have tested and rated the Mitsubishi-manufactured Verbatim DVD+R as the most reliable and accurate - by some margin- of all DVD recordables.
If your DVD player will cope with DVD+R and few don't these days, that's the way to go. I've recorded well over 100 Verbatim +R's and have had no failures at all.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

CNET FORUMS TOP DISCUSSION

Help, my PC with Windows 10 won't shut down properly

Since upgrading to Windows 10 my computer won't shut down properly. I use the menu button shutdown and the screen goes blank, but the system does not fully shut down. The only way to get it to shut down is to hold the physical power button down till it shuts down. Any suggestions?