Question

DSC-HX5V settings question

I'm a mom of four busy kids. So I frequently take pictures of moving children. I want my subject to be clear and in focus. How can I do this while making the background blurry?

I took some great pics today of my children in front of a waterfall. I've seen other photos of water where the water looked blurry but the rocks and things in perfect focus. I was hoping to achieve this affect with my child in the foreground.

Any suggestions for creative pictures of children?

Thanks tons!!!!
sarah

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Answer
re: making the background blurry

>"I want my subject [moving children] to be
clear and in focus. ... while making the background
blurry?"

This effect (bokeh) is most commonly achieved through the use of a fast/bright (large aperture) lens (f/2.0-ish) on a large-ish sensor (4/3, APS-C or above). Although the distance to the subject and the focal length also factor into it.

>"I've seen other photos of water where the water looked blurry but the rocks and things in perfect focus."

This is usually a different effect achieved through the use of a slow shutter speed (and possibly a neutral density filter for proper exposure). It's possible to use a different technique because, unlike the children in the previous situation, the rocks here aren't moving.

HTH - Mark

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thank you

thank you for replying to my post!

How do I make my camera do that? its a sony DSC-HX5V cyber-shot.

thanks a ton!!

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It's beyond the capability of that camera.

Even at the max aperture of f/3.5, the DSC-HX5's lens is too slow. And at 1/2.4, the sensor is too small.

The best you can do is kinda, sorta fake it by zooming in while your child is close to the camera and the background is far away.

Sorry - Mark

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