HolidayBuyer's Guide

The CNET Lounge forum

General discussion

Dr. M strikes again

by minimalist / September 27, 2008 7:12 AM PDT

This time Wal-Mart's turning off the activation servers:

http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/09/27/wal-mart-closes-drm-system-sorry-your-songs-are-toast/

I am just dying for a class action lawsuit to hit the record companies (and hit them hard) for insisting their songs be shackled with what are effectively digital time bombs. Technically I know this is Wal-Mart's problem and they shold be made an example of as well (they did after all choose to share this bed with the devil.) But am pretty sure the record companies could be held liable for this mess.

If the courts could make an example of them I'd be willing to bet that the record industry would think twice about this little game of DRM manipulation they are playing with Apple. If they knew they could be held partially responsible for these kinds of technology failures, I suspect they would be more than a little scared to keep insisting that the largest record store in the US continue selling their music with DRM.

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Dr. M strikes again
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Dr. M strikes again
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Dr. M strikes again
by wizkids32 / September 27, 2008 7:26 AM PDT
In reply to: Dr. M strikes again

I know that but I think I burned all the songs that I brought way back when because they didn't go straight to my iPod so I am OK.

Collapse -
That's fine (and smart) But you shouldn't have to do this.
by minimalist / September 27, 2008 8:09 AM PDT
In reply to: Dr. M strikes again

Not only does it further degrade sound quality when you re-rip them as mp3's but its not a valid response from Wal-Mart to say "just rip them to a disc and reimport them"

Its a half-@ssed solution and I don' see how instructing their customers on how to get around the limits of copyright protection makes Wal-Mart any less liable than if they just unlocked all the songs to begin with.

I know, I know... there are legal contracts and license agreements between Wal-Mart and the record companies that prohibit them from unlocking the files, yada, yada, yada. This still doesn't change the fact that TOGETHER both Wal-Mart and the record companies created a flawed system that eventually screws the consumer that legally paid for those files.

If CD's you bought from Best Buy stopped playing the day Best Buy went out of business you can bet your @ss that there would be some legal smack down.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

The Samsung RF23M8090SG

One of the best French door fridges we've tested

A good-looking fridge with useful features like an auto-filling water pitcher and a temperature-adjustable "FlexZone" drawer. It was a near-flawless performer in our cooling tests.