General discussion

Do you have the weird need to prove people wrong?

I sure do!
But I've always wondered why?
I've got a lot of friends in school who are just the same.

Could someone speculate about this?
Talk to someone who might know and PLEASE tell me!!!!!

P.S. Is everyone like this? Is this a disease inflicked on humanity?
( yeah yeah I know I spelt inflicked wrong)

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Comments
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Agree

Honestly i totaly agree but i am not sure either. It seems like everyone acts like this or do they? well im confused

O well, good thought though

-Grin

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I call it "Slashdot syndrome"

...That absolutely insufferable childish obsession with pedantry.

I refuse to deal with it in real life, and can only stomach it on the internet by way of very careful and strategic avoidance tactics.

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I wouldn't say

that I have a need to prove people wrong so much as I prefer to prove that I'm right. Are you sure that's not what you mean? Or, do you mean you take pleasure in belittling people?

-Kevin S.

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I use to more so in the past then I do now...

but now I tend to usually prove people wrong by questioning and challenging them if they are in leadership positions of power and authority only if I feel they have lied, contradicted themselves, threatened someone with less authority for no valid reason, or abused their power.

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No, it's a meta-argument. Link that explains this ....
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(NT) Could you tell me where I can watch that video?

Could you post it in here please?
the link I mean

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I love Monty Python

I have seen that skit in the past, and it was hilarious.

-Ryan

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Lifeboat Theory

Perhaps it's similar to the idea that we as humans are all in a lifeboat not quite large enough for everyone. We will do anything to NOT be the last one or the person that gets thrown out.
The funny thing is that it's not like we want other people to be thrown out. More, that we just don't believe that we should be the one. Consiquently, most people (myself included) even make these 'lifeboat statements' to their friends. Kind of like sarcasm - understood as not really true - but still hurts somehow...
Furthermore - it seems that it is quite clearly a universal human trait.
Not that there is anything wrong with proving something incorrect. But it's the tactic we use. The 'I'm righter than you' approch should be the one to avoid.

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You're Wrong

You don't actually have a need to prove people wrong, nor does anybody else. And I can prove it. Wink

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"Please, sir. May I have some more? . . . . MORE???? "

We are born completely helpless, totally dependent, without our cortex being developed enough to override our primitive and self-centered lower brain functions. But this is not enough to cause the condition of which we speak. Another aspect needs to be thrown into the mix.

We are born to caretakers of finite resources and imperfect abilities (our parents and teachers and other caregivers). And this means that our (perception of) infinite needs/wants must compete with the finite resources and imperfect abilities of our caretakers.

This, in turn, sets up a competition for those resources and abilities (a competition that is unnecessary but seems imperative at the time). And, again, that, in turn, sets up a situation to cause us to try to prove that we are more worthy than siblings/cousins/fellow students/etc.

We soon find out that if we can get our competition to look 'bad' it is easier than the effort it takes for us to look 'good'. So, we cast the blame for the broken window on our innocent but defenses little brother and he misses out on the ice cream dessert that evening, while we enjoy not only the fruit of the dairy section but also the satisfaction that it took less effort to make him look 'wrong' than it does for us to get an "A" on our spelling test.

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So you're saying that.........

So making ourselves look good is a way of survival?
Like if we look good to people who have more power than us they might end up helping us right?
I agree!
Cause that is really what a lot of things in humanity are.
Make yourself look good in sports you could get sponsered or a scholarship.
Or make yourself look good in the tech world and you might get a big job or free products!!!!!!
Hey Free Products!!!
Where have I heard that before?
Was it a podcast?
Mabye.............

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Perfect example.... Willy Wonka

The perfect example of this scenario is played out in the movie Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. (I have not seen the new one with Depp, just the old one.)

Each of the children chosen prove themselves to be unworthy of inheriting the chocolate factory in one way or another until the last child is left. Of course he 'gets it all' not only the lifetime supply of chocolate but the factory itself.

So, we are 'programmed' to try to reveal the flaws in others assuming that the reward will come to us. So we spar with each other in a verbal compettition to outsmart or trip up our adversary.

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You're all wrong

Somebody had to say it.

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You are!

Oh my, how the tables have turned now. Mwahahaha!

-Ryan

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Another example - 'bad' coworkers in the workplace
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I guess it all starts when we are young with the

Remember back.
Argueing with your little friend in preschool or someplace over who is right.
Remember the
"yahuh"
"nuhuh"
Which eventually developed into the
"I am right because ...........(very long speech)"
"You are wrong because.......(another very long speech)" for some people while for others it still stays with the
"yahuh"
"nuhuh".


Like veronica!!!!!!!!!!!

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I DOUBLE-DOG dare ya!

Remember the sequence in "A Christmas Story" where there was a kid who was sure that if you stuck your tounge on a metal pole in freezing weather that it would NOT get stuck?

He was double-dog-dared into doing it and got his tounge stuck!

Not only was he proven wrong, but he paid the price for being so arrogant as to not listen to popoular-myth/urban-ledgends.

Of course the real pay-off would come from the respect given the kid that was right. His word would subsequently be given extra consideration on the playground..... He may have even been able to start a playground consulting service.....

"for half of your cupcake I will settle the argument about which marble looks better"

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He He He. Silly Kids

What? I would never do something like that!!!!

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Double Dare?

I thought he was TRIPLE Dawg dared. Woops, there I go thinking everyone but me is wrong.

I'm pretty sure it was a triple dog dare (THERE IS A DIFFERENCE).

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I sometimes have the urge to prove people wrong ..

.. but usually I will do it tactfully, or do it without the other person even knowing that i'm proving them wrong.


-Terry

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Wrong - we know

Your are wrong, wrong, wrong....

We DO know when you are trying to prove us wrong! We are just too tacktful to tell you that we know....

(except this time, of course)

MUUHH--HHAAA--HHAA--haa--ha

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(NT) (NT) Durn, I hate being wrong .... LOL
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(NT) (NT) Duh Who would like being wrong?

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