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Digital Camera Filter Major Flaw - Image Stabilization

by PurplePencil / September 18, 2009 5:43 AM PDT

I am a little confused about the cnet camera chooser and how cnet lists specifications. I went through the filter and was looking at some Cannon digital Rebel cameras (as I liked the quality of the sample shots). These models (and other brands) were listed as having optical image stabilization via the filter; however, as I read through the lengthly camera reviews they instead said that the cameras DOES NOT have built-in image stabilization, but instead this is provided only by attaching a lens with such technology.

The filters need to be updated to show image stabilization in camera vs in the lens:

1. There is important technical debate over which is better thus a user should not have to need to read through all the lengthly reviews if they do not want in lens only camera. Thats frankly a lot of money to pay for a camera to not have this.

2. Cameras with lens only stabilization will cost you more money as the lenses cost more. I regard this a cheap marketing ploy whereas they give you a technically inferior camera in order to they sell you more expensive lenses. I am seriously doubting Cannon now over this point.

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Actually, you are quite wrong.
by Desperado JC / September 18, 2009 6:05 AM PDT

Canon's image stabilization technology (in the lens) is not a cheap marketing ploy. Optical stabilization (in the lens) actually produces better results than in-camera stabilization. That is why it is used on Canon's more expensive cameras. Nikon also uses lens based optical stabilization on its DSLR cameras, so this decision is not unique to Canon. Sony is the only DSLR maker that I know of which uses in-camera stabilization.

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LOL!
by PurplePencil / September 18, 2009 7:16 AM PDT

"Optical stabilization (in the lens) actually produces better results than in-camera stabilization."

Sorry, but that is a matter of opinion as outlined in various online debates. Show me the technical scientific data that proves this along with your credentials as an "expert".

"That is why it is used on Canon's more expensive cameras. Nikon also uses lens based optical stabilization on its DSLR cameras, so this decision is not unique to Canon. Sony is the only DSLR maker that I know of which uses in-camera stabilization."

The fact that several manufacturers do X does mean anything other than they have the similar "sales concepts" to maximize profits by selling more expensive lenses (its like giving away a printer and then making a mint on the ink). For several decades every major automobile manufacturer used delayed wipers in their cars, which would let one to think that they had developed some great technology, yet this was based on stolen patents from the original inventor - sorry I don't believe anything a manufacturer says offhand.

And because you are not aware of it it must not exist? This is why the cnet camera chooser is broken. If indeed Sony is the only one I'd have to read through every single review to find this as opposed to using the camera chooser filters. When I choose image stabilization in the cnet camera chooser - writefully thinking the camera has built-in stabilization - I should not then have to read otherwise in the review (typical Cnet Cannon Statement):

"It lacks common perks Sony, Pentax, and Olympus include in their cameras, like in-body mechanical stabilization and a wireless flash controller in the body, a feature I occasionally find quite useful. The inclusion of an image-stabilizing kit lens doesn't quite compensate, since additional optically stabilized lenses tend to cost more in the long run.

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Need URL
by snapshot2 Forum moderator / September 18, 2009 6:12 AM PDT

I have not found the filter that you described.

Please provide a link to that filter, so that I can take a look at it.

Thanks.
..
.

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Write Here on Cnet's Camera Chooser
by PurplePencil / September 18, 2009 6:57 AM PDT
In reply to: Need URL
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CNET chooser
by snapshot2 Forum moderator / September 18, 2009 9:37 AM PDT

I will flag your post so that it can be forwarded to the correct person.

As to which type of stabilization is used by which manufacturer.
That has more to do with who owns the patents on which method, and the cost to buy the rights to use that patent.

Kodak for one.... makes a lot of money selling rights to its many photographic patents.

..
.

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You're wrong on what you said here

"2. Cameras with lens only stabilization will cost you more money as the lenses cost more. I regard this a cheap marketing ploy whereas they give you a technically inferior camera in order to they sell you more expensive lenses. I am seriously doubting Cannon now over this point."

Check the prices of the Sony lenses and compare them to the same Canon lenses with image stabilization. What you find is that Sony's lenses are more expensive than Canon's image stabilized lenses. What you stated is a complete myth made up by people that own cameras with image stabilization in the body of the camera.

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Distortion
by PurplePencil / September 18, 2009 8:26 AM PDT

"2. Cameras with lens only stabilization will cost you more money as the lenses cost more. I regard this a cheap marketing ploy whereas they give you a technically inferior camera in order to they sell you more expensive lenses. I am seriously doubting Cannon now over this point."

Check the prices of the Sony lenses and compare them to the same Canon lenses with image stabilization. What you find is that Sony's lenses are more expensive than Canon's image stabilized lenses. What you stated is a complete myth made up by people that own cameras with image stabilization in the body of the camera."

That is s total distortion of the facts. The fact is you will be paying more over time for a camera without built-in image stabilization as opposed to one with it because you need to always buy lenses with it, which are more expensive. What does Cnet's own review say of Cannon:

"The inclusion of an image-stabilizing kit lens doesn't quite compensate, since additional optically stabilized lenses tend to cost more in the long run."

So Cnet is wrong LOL!

And this does NOT address the technical aspect of built-in vs lens - i.e., which is better from a quality point of view - a debate which has being going on for some time. Where is the data to prove one over the other? This is why the cnet camera chooser is broken - it needs to denote more information about image stabilization.

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Cnet can be wrong and is on this
by kalel33-20416052469708587370302374692233 / September 18, 2009 8:50 AM PDT
In reply to: Distortion

I found 5 errors that were wrong on the review of the Canon T1I and parts of the review were changed. So as they are human, they are fallible. Since you can't or won't look up the prices yourself I'll give you a few. All of these prices are from B&H and you can look them up.

Canon 70-300mm IS USM- $549
Sony 70-300mm G- $849

Canon 18-55mm IS- $170
Sony 18-55mm- $199

Now the 18-200mm lens is $50 more for the Canon and the 70-200mm is $150 more for the Canon($1800 vs $1950), but this shows that either the image stabilization is cheap to put into a lens and is doesn't have an effect on choosing one system over another or that Sony is raping their customers with overpriced lens.

If you have some information besides relying on someone else then I'd like to hear it. I don't try to debate a subject without having the facts handy to go against myths.

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