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Defective Component? But Which One?

by Mr. Harmless / June 5, 2004 4:42 AM PDT

I'm rather new to this computer building game, so I was hoping you all could help me out with this. I bought all the components needed, and I put them all together, and, frankly, it doesn't work. It doesn't turn on or anything. I'm told that if the motherboard, cpu and power supply are in working condition, the heatsink fan should at least turn on, but it doesn't. I'm also a little afraid that I may have damaged the CPU when I installed the heatsink (AMD heatsinks are a bit tricky. I didn't hear a crack or anything, and I don't see any damage, but, like I said, I'm new to all this.). I also voided the CPU warranty by replacing the thermal goo with Arctic Silver.

So at this point I'm looking to send a few things back to Newegg for repair, but before I do that, I was wondering if anyone has any advice as to narrowing it down before I send everything back in with a "I don't know what's wrong. Help?" note attached. Thanks in advance.

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Re:Defective Component? But Which One?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 5, 2004 4:51 AM PDT

The "test" for no power up is simple.

Cardboard to set the motherboard, power supply on and then the switch or a conductive pen-tip to power just two parts up. No power is you've brought it down to two parts.

System builders are expected to have the AC on the proper 110 or 220V setting and not leave the CMOS reset jumper in reset or to be able to measure the CMOS Battery is "good."

Bob

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Re:Re:Defective Component? But Which One?
by Mr. Harmless / June 5, 2004 5:01 AM PDT

Hmm. I'm not sure I follow. What do you mean exactly by "the switch or a conductive pen-tip to power just two parts up."? And should I take everything out of the mobo first? CPU included?

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Re:Re:Re:Defective Component? But Which One?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 5, 2004 5:22 AM PDT

1. Hmm. I'm not sure I follow. What do you mean exactly by "the switch or a conductive pen-tip to power just two parts up."?

As a system builder you know that to power up an ATX PC, you need to connect a switch to the motherboard on some jumper. To bring the number of possible bad parts to just 2, we just put these two parts on cardboard (non-conductive surface) and use a metal pen-tip or such instead of the pushbutton.

2. And should I take everything out of the mobo first? CPU included?

Your choice here. I'm offering how to start with the lowest number of components. If you have 3 or more parts, then you have that many more possible bad items...

Bob

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Re:Re:Re:Re:Defective Component? But Which One?
by Mr. Harmless / June 5, 2004 5:33 AM PDT

Ah. I think I understand. What should I be looking for though? How will I know if the motherboard is recieving power?

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Test result would be...
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 5, 2004 7:59 AM PDT

"Ah. I think I understand. What should I be looking for though? How will I know if the motherboard is recieving power?"

The power supply fan would come on. That's all this test is about. Then we could test that we could turn it off by shorting out the power on connection for 4 to 12 seconds...

Now that we have two parts that seem to work, we can add more, but this test is simple and should take less than 5 minutes...

Bob

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