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CUP usage

by Marc985 / December 1, 2004 1:38 PM PST

My sister's computer is running incredibly slow. I came home from college and i knew it'd be a mess...after going through, finding all the spyware i could/deleting it it is still running slow.

The windows task manager says the CPU usage is at 90% with no programs running...what's going on?


Intel Celeron 2.6GHz
256ram
Windows XP home edition


thanks for your help

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Re: CUP usage
by Kees Bakker / December 1, 2004 4:04 PM PST
In reply to: CUP usage

The Windows XP task manager (ctrl-alt-del, then task manager, then processes) shows all processes with their CPU. One of them is 'idle', and that's not a process, but just the CPU doing nothing.
So I don't understand where you can see 90% coupled to no process at all. Can you explain?

Kees

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Re: CUP usage
by Marc985 / December 2, 2004 12:09 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage

I mean im not running any processes other then what windows would run by itself....ill take a screen shot...now in this shot it says im running firefox/whatever else but with everything shut down it still says 90%


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v505/Marc985/stuff.jpg


thats what i mean....Its running incredibly slow and i dont think it should be using 90% of the CPU (if thats what it means) i know my computer in geogria at college will say it's only using maybe 3% of the CPU)

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Re: CUP usage
by Cursorcowboy / December 2, 2004 12:28 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage
Memory, Speed, and Performance May Decrease

1. The article [Q310419] describes issues concerning computer speed and decreased performance caused by programs loaded at startup, programs that create memory leaks, and the situation when a computer has a small or minimal amount of random access memory (RAM), or a slower central processing unit (CPU).

2. The article [Q822430] explains that when you click a large Audio Video Interleaved (AVI) file in Explorer, Windows may stop responding (hang), you notice that the Explorer.exe process consumes 100 percent of CPU usage for up to two hours or more and occurs when Windows tries to query the index of the file which isn't there and then attemps to build one. Read the TweakXP tip "AVI files causing high cpu usage again with installation of XP SP1" to prevent Explorer from loading shmedia.dll in response to their file property queries causing 100% cpu usage.

3. The article [Q314056] describes Svchost.exe (%SystemRoot%\System32 folder), the generic host process name for services that run from dynamic-link libraries (DLLs), can run in multiple instances at the same time and each session can contain a grouping of services so they can run depending on how and where it is started. Please note, the built-in "Task Scheduler" -- a "huge word that" (Schedsvc.dll) component is made up of the MSTask.exe service file and a user interface (UI) component in MSTask.dll that you can use through Windows Explorer or through Control Panel and is hosted by the file Svchost.exe in the Netsvcs group.

Note: If you feel a service stared and running is to blamed for the excessive CPU usage, use the procedure in [Q811267] to stop services one at a time simply for the purpose of determining which one could be causing the anomaly. "Starter" is yet another free startup manager that allows you to view and manage all the programs that are starting automatically whenever Windows boots. It lists all the hidden registry entries, as well as the common Startup Folder items. You can choose to safely disable selected entries, edit them or delete them altogether (if you know what you're doing). Expert users can even add their own entries.

4. The Power Options Tool (Powercfg.exe) is a utility which was introduced in Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1) that can be accessed from this tool in Control Panel to set certain power options. Whether they will be of use or help is anybody's guess, [Q324347].

5. When a Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC) application is run on WinXP, a memory leaks for Graphics Device Interface (GDI) objects may be seen when creating and destroying child windows and can be observed in the GDI objects of the process in Task Manager. This can occur when a program make many calls to the StgCreateDocFile function to create compound storage objects and causes a 512-byte memory leak to occur - an error, STG_E_FILEALREADYEXISTS (0x80030050). To resolve problems of this type when applicable, "Obtain the Latest Windows XP Service Pack" described in [Q319740].

6. The article [Q309073] states that by sending a particular set of commands to an affected system, an attacker could gradually deplete resources on the system to the point where performance could be slowed or stopped altogether. The vulnerability results because the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) service that either ships with or can be installed does not correctly handle certain requests and can cause a memory leak.

7. The article [Q315000] states that unchecked buffer in Universal Plug and Play can lead to System Compromise and describes two vulnerabilities that affect the implementation of UPnP in various products. Although the vulnerabilities are unrelated, both involve how UPnP-capable computers process the discovery of new devices on the network. To resolve this problem obtain the latest sevice pack for Windows XP.

8. Laptop users may experience this problem if the power policy changes because of an AC/DC transition while the computer is using the "Max Battery" power scheme. When the computer is running at 100 percent CPU usage, the computer never enters the idle loop in which the speed of the CPU is dynamically adjusted based on demand and current policy values. The supported fix is now available from Microsoft, but it is only intended to correct the problem that is described in, [Q330512].

9. Open Task Manager and click the Processes tab to see a list of "running processes" (click to see a screen shot) - click the CPU column header to sort the list of processes by their CPU utilization as desired.

a. You may find that if the Microsoft Indexing Service (Cidaemon.exe) is used and cause the high CPU utilization.

b. In Task Manager, you can right-click an active program or process and change the amount of CPU power it gets until it's closed, which then reverts back to the XP's default assignment -- Low, BelowNormal, Normal, AboveNormal, High and Realtime.

10. While on the subject of CPU usage and how to tell -- or should I say "attempt to tell", I wonder if Microsoft really fixed things for XP. Referencing an older published article [Q227131], it explains that the System Monitor tool may display incorrect CPU Usage that can occur for any of the following reasons, and which you can safely ignore since it is not indicative of a problem:

? CPU usage rises to somewhere between 20-60 percent even though you are not running any programs.
? CPU usage declines sharply when you move your mouse.
? CPU usage declines sharply either when you run Windows Media Player or play a .wav file.
? CPU usage rises when you dial-up to connect.
? CPU usage does not fall from 100 percent.

Note: In addition, the older article [Q178563] states that if you use System Monitor to monitor more than one occurrence of "Kernel: Processor Usage," the second and following occurrences of "Kernel: Processor Usage" show 100 percent processor usage. As a workaround to this behavior, use only one occurrence of "Kernel: Processor Usage" in System Monitor, or use two separate occurrences of System Monitor.

11.The article [Q819946] explains a problem and the possible fix that when you right-click an item (such as a file, a folder, or a network connection) in Windows Explorer or in My Computer, other programs may temporarily stop performing a task. In addition, if you start Windows Task Manager (right-click an empty area on the taskbar, and then click it), you may notice on the Processes tab that the Explorer.exe process is using a lot (or 100 percent) of the CPU resources.
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Re: CUP usage
by Yew / December 2, 2004 12:35 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage

Ignore our MSKB bot... It just proves the whole "90% of everything is crap" rule is a load of bollox... When it posts something, you're lucky if it's only 90% crap.

The problem quite clearly is the svchost process. Trouble is, that program is used to run a number of different services, so pinpointing which one it is exactly is a problem.

You'll have to manually go through the services list and see if you can spot any oddities there. Any services that don't seem to belong. Particularly ones that don't have any kind of description, and you can't readily identify as part of your graphics driver, or anti-virus program.

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Re: CUP usage
by Marc985 / December 2, 2004 1:25 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage

This stuff is above me....haha

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Re: CUP usage
by Marc985 / December 2, 2004 1:36 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage

What's this "MSKB bot"?

"You'll have to manually go through the services list and see if you can spot any oddities there. Any services that don't seem to belong. Particularly ones that don't have any kind of description, and you can't readily identify as part of your graphics driver, or anti-virus program."

how do i know which dont belong?...what looks suspicous to you on that list?

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Re: CUP usage
by Yew / December 2, 2004 2:49 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage

The MSKB bot is Cursorcowboy, which according to legend was once actually a person. Since I've been here, it seems that you can reliably expect any Cursorcowboy post to be full of MSKB (Microsoft Knowledge Base... Something of a misnomer and oxymoron) links which have absolutely no connection to the post far greater than 90% of the time.

And the services list is found in the Control Panel. Specifically, in the Administrator Tools section of the Control Panel. You'll get a window with a sort of two pane interface, and on the right hand side you'll see a long list of various services. Clicking on one should cause the discription to be displayed on the left. Be wary of any that have no description and aren't obviously named like "nvidia" something or "ati" something.

If there's one you can't identify and doesn't have any sort of description, type that name into Google and see what comes up. It's a tedious process, but it's about the only way you're going to clear this up, and usually only has to be done once an install.

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Re: CUP usage
by Marc985 / December 2, 2004 4:07 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage
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Re: CUP usage
by Kees Bakker / December 2, 2004 3:18 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage

Yewanchors is totally right. One of the svchost processes is using excessive CPU, and it's up to you to find out which one of the services this is. You're sure to find it eventually be elimination.

One part of Cursorcowboy's post might be useful. That's:
Note: If you feel a service stared and running is to blamed for the excessive CPU usage, use the procedure in http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q811267 to stop services one at a time simply for the purpose of determining which one could be causing the anomaly. Starter (see the original post for a link) is yet another free startup manager that allows you to view and manage all the programs that are starting automatically whenever Windows boots. It lists all the hidden registry entries, as well as the common Startup Folder items. You can choose to safely disable selected entries, edit them or delete them altogether (if you know what you're doing).

If you feel you need any help just post the list of services here and members will comment on it.

Hope this helps.


Kees

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Re: Something else?
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / December 2, 2004 3:40 AM PST
In reply to: Re: CUP usage

I noticed in your screen print that you had not enabled "Show processes from all users", at the bottom of the left image.

Probably nothing, but if this computer has more than one account, eg yours and your sister's, is there something else running in the other acocunt?

Mark

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Mark, A Thought About One Of the Services...
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / December 2, 2004 5:09 AM PST
In reply to: CUP usage

Is the computer using a large HOSTS file? If that's the case, then the "DNS Client" service should be set to "manual" or "disable" instead of "Automatic". I've seen some Win 2000 and XP computers which slowed to a crawl because of this setting. To do that, RIGHT click on the "DNS Client" listing, choose "Properties", then change the "Start Up Type" to "manual" or "disable".

Hope this helps.

Grif

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Re: Mark, A Thought About One Of the Services...
by Marc985 / December 2, 2004 5:37 AM PST

what is a HOSTS file?

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What is a 'Hosts" File?
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / December 2, 2004 8:20 AM PST
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Re: Mark, A Thought About One Of the Services...
by Marc985 / December 2, 2004 5:45 AM PST

I set it to disable now its varying between 10-30%

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Well, It Helped But Didn't Cure....
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / December 2, 2004 8:24 AM PST

My next step would be to follow the procedures in the link below, especially the steps for eliminating unnecessary "Services" from the links at the bottom of the page. Skip the first few sentences as they apply to earlier versions of Windows, but eliminating start up programs from "msconfig" is important...as well as those services.

How To Shut Down Unnecessary Start Up Programs

Hope this helps.

Grif

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