Question

Connecting outside speakers to standard 5.1 receiver

I want to add two outside speakers to my standard 5.1 system. There are no additional speaker connectors on my receiver. Is there a way to do this?

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Answer
Connecting outside speakers to standard 5.1 receiver

Go wireless (transmitter plugs into the headphone jack) or get one of those speaker switchers I used to see in electronics stores and I'm not even sure a switcher would work. They were used for two speaker stereo demos.
By the way, how old and what is the make and model of the receiver (or is it a HTIB)?

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Connecting outside speakers

The receiver is a Yamaha HTR-3064 vintage 2010-11. I like the idea of some sort of switcher device if I can find one. I replaced a 16 year old Sony receiver which was capable of handling 2 sets of speakers and had push down buttons to play either of the two sets or both sets.

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Connecting outside speakers to standard 5.1 receiver

Very nice receiver.
I don't believe you're going to find a speaker selector that handles 5.1 systems (do you have a 5.1 speaker setup?). If you do have 5.1 speakers, you may want to get a selector and only have the 2 front right and left channel speakers connected to the selector from the receiver and then out to the same speakers. The outdoor speakers would be connected to another output on the selector and turn surround off on the receiver so nothing goes to the other speakers in the 5.1 system when using the outdoor speakers. Also, since you have a decent AVR, I'm not sure if you would "lose" anything audio wise going from the receiver through a selector and back to the front left and rights.
I think you have to be careful with selectors. Here's a little info.
http://www.amazon.com/Monster-Cable-SS4-Multi-Speaker-Selector/dp/B00004Y3UX/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1307875582&sr=1-1

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Outside speakers

Thanks for all your help. Yes its a 5.1 speaker setup. I've looked at this product and it seems simple enough for my limited electronics know-how. It looks like you connect the front speakers terminals on the receiver to the input on the speaker selector and then output from the selector to the front speakers and the 2 outdoor speakers. The selctor appears to be able to play the 5.1 system and the outdoor sppeakers at the same time.
www.outdoorspeakerdepot.com/isipo4pasps.html">http://www.outdoorspeakerdepot.com/isipo4pasps.html

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Outside speakers

Yes, it can but when I play music through my outdoor speakers I turn the surround off on the receiver(no music in the house, especially if no one is inside) and you get true stereo through the outdoor speakers and not just surround front and left).

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Outside Speakers

I didn't think about that aspect. What if I use the center speaker terminal - would I still get the surround inside the house while I have the music outside as well. Generally, when we have the outside speakers on, we also have the music inside.

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Outside Speakers

I wasn't clear in my last response. I do have A and B speakers on the old receiver I used. Besides turning off the surround, I would disable the A speakers (where my 5.1 was located). This gave me music outside only and in stereo. If I wanted music inside and out, I'd leave the A speakers on and keep the surround off.
Using the center and keping the surround on-- you'll get whatever music the receiver directs to the center, which in music isn't much. People inside would get the surround. If you only have a pair of speakers outside, why surround? People inside would have to suffer with just stereo instead of a DSP'd surround.
Since your only option is the selector, might as well get one and try out the different methods we talked about and see what works best.

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