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Computer reboots itself when online

by mommapez / July 17, 2008 1:49 AM PDT

Hi, I have a AMD Sempron processor using Win XP. I have had it for quite some time now, but it is starting to reboot itself when I am online. I am on a website and it goes blank and reboots itself. Any suggestions as to how to fix this problem. I recently downloaded AVG 8.0. Thanks..

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Just cured one like that.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 17, 2008 1:56 AM PDT

We did the cleaning noted at this Cnet video -> http://reviews.cnet.com/Clean_up_your_laptop/4660-10165_7-6648292.html then put it on a laptop cooling pad.

The clue for that machine was that the reboot took place about a minute after getting on the internet.

-> Your choice of AVG 8 is a good one but today, for now, I think you want to look at the TASK MANAGER and if that is hitting 100%, look and see if AVG is sucking up all the CPU cycles. If so, try AVAST.
Bob

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A Couple Of Suggestions..
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / July 17, 2008 2:01 AM PDT

Because the problem may be heat related and depending on whether this is a laptop or a desktop, be sure to remove the cover and use compressed air to blow out all the dust from the processor, heat sink, power supply, and all the fans..

Next, since you didn't tell us which browser you're using, if you haven't already, try using a different browser such as the free Firefox from the link below:

http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/

And finally, because the online difficulties may be related to malware, please download, install, update, then run the free spyware removal tool from the link below.. (If possible, run a full system scan while in Safe Mode using the tool.)

SUPERAntispyware Removal Tool

Hope this helps.

Grif

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I have put AVG on hold
by mommapez / July 18, 2008 3:14 AM PDT

Thank you for your replies. I ran Super Anti spyware and it detected 1 threat. As I was running that program Avast popped up and detected a threat also. It was a worm. I deleted it and restarted my computer which is a desktop. I also put AVG on hold. My firewall showed at the start of these news programs that they had threats when trying to get into my computer. Any suggestions. I will continue to monitor. I am for the time being going to keep Avast running and Super Anti Spyware available and I have shut down AVG. The program Super Anti Spyware that is NOT free detected 243 threats. I was just wondering why the free spyware from the same company only detected 1. Thank you again.

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How they work
by Wotstuffz / July 20, 2008 9:34 PM PDT
In reply to: I have put AVG on hold

That question has many answers, depending on the software.
In most cases, however, the 'free' version of a software is designed to search for particular types of threats, and *only* those threats, often bypassing other critical issues along the way.

When the software detects an issue in the system, it reports it, and (in most cases) prompts you to buy the extended version for more cover etc. etc. (we all know the drill with these programs). The main 'bought' program will have the full cover available, and search parameters active to look for less obvious threats.

This sort of program set up is just another way for companies to make money, and get people to buy their products. When you activate the extended copy, or buy/download it, the new updates become avaliable for you to use.

Hope this shed some light on the matter. I am in no way an expert, but I hope it helped none the less.

Cheers,
Mike.

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Just sharing more.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 20, 2008 10:46 PM PDT
In reply to: How they work

I've run into more than one 100% CPU LOAD now (discounting the ones here in this forum) and it can cause issues with some machines due to basic design of or by the usual owner never cleans the parts that need it.
Bob

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