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Comcast TV over Ethernet

<div id="post_message_21284849">I apologize in advance if this is in the wrong
forum...

Im looking for a little advice regarding a project I have been
assigned to.
We have recently moved into a building where the construction
and layout prevents us from easily running Coax cable up from the basement
(where the TV service comes in) up to the offices where the TV's and tuners will
exist (Ground Floor). The office building is an old rehabbed house with very
clean, and newer data runs coming up from the basement connected through your
standard patch panel. What I was hoping to do was to use converters at each end
of the Cat5e drops to convert the Video signal using MuxLab CATV Balun II's .....
Comcast Install team (TV provider) was out the other day and had their testing
equipment with them. They mentioned that the Video signal was well below the
adequate level required to activate the cable boxes let alone produce a good
signal on the TV's

My question is - is there anything I can do/buy to
boost the signal (Ethernet repeater, etc...) at the network level to perhaps
increase the levels to and adequate video signal strength?
The distance
between where the service comes in at the basement to where the offices are, is
not that far. However since its not a home run, I do not know exactly how far
the data cable has to travel....
Also please feel free to ask any questions if
you think I missed some detail trying to explain my issue.
As always thanks
for your help in advance..
- Chad</div>

olblueeyz has chosen the best answer to their question. View answer
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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by olblueeyz

Collapse -
Work on incoming signal first...

In reply to: Comcast TV over Ethernet

You mentioned that Comcast technicians measured the incoming signal to be at "well below the adequate level required to activate the cable boxes". Since you are paying for their service, they are required to provide an adequate signal to your building; otherwise, how in the world would you expect to be able to use their services (i.e. watch TV)? They should provide a cable amplifier that will boost the signal to a suitable level. If you feel so inclined, you can purchase these yourself from many online merchants.

Don't confuse these baluns to be networking devices. The baluns do not convert the signal to ethernet (a networking protocol), it only allows the video signal to travel over twisted pair on Cat 5 cables. So, an ethernet repeater/switch or other network device will do nothing for you.

First, you need to get an adequate signal to the building. Then you can try these baluns and perhaps you will be able to get a useable signal to the rest of the building. Don't expect miracles with them though, because you may be disappointed. I would follow Bob's advice and have a good electrician professionally install some quality RG6.

Collapse -
agreed

In reply to: Work on incoming signal first...

<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">Thank you all.. for your suggestions.
Comcast has delivered the signal to the building, but said they will not be responsible for cutting, drilling, pulling the coax to the offices.. that would be on my dime.
Today, I'm going to go to RadioShack and pick up a sig amp.... Install it and see what happens.
the last option would be for them to drill into the building directly from the service pole outside the building.
Im going to hope it does not come to that, as it would frustrated the landlord.
I will post back the results from today's experiment....
Thank you again to everyone's contribution.
</font>
<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font>

Collapse -
success

In reply to: agreed

so purchasing a cheap RF inline Signal Amp seemed to make the picture much more clear going directly to the TV tuner... next step will be going directly into the Comcast receiver...
I'll post back after that happens at the end of the week.
-cheers

Collapse -
Luck.

In reply to: success

Good luck with the rest of the set up, and let us know how everything works out.

Collapse -
Time To Drill

In reply to: Luck.

No Luck ... even with the Signal Amp, the video signal was not strong enough to get any channels beyond the 2,3,5,7,9 etc....
Looks like we will have to drill from the outside.
Thanks to everyone's input here, its appreciated.

Collapse -
Answer
Are you conversante about impedance matching?

In reply to: Comcast TV over Ethernet

Collapse -
But.....

In reply to: Are you conversante about impedance matching?

<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font><span style="'font-family:" "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 11pt;'>Thanks for
getting back to me...<?xml:namespace prefix =" o" ns =" "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office"" /><o:p></o:p>
<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font><span style="'font-family:" "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 11pt;'>Others has
said the same thing, however the cost to run coax is pretty significant
considering it would involve cutting up a decent amount of drywall and perhaps
even coring through the floor.<o:p></o:p>
<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font><span style="'font-family:" "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 11pt;'>Would
putting a Amplifier at the head end (prior) to the conversion to Ethernet help,
or does the impedance factor still to much to overcome?<o:p></o:p>
<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font>

Collapse -
font size?

In reply to: But.....

face?

Sorry but your post is riddled with formatting codes that all I can answer is that an engineering team may be able to get the signal over the wires you have now. But at what cost?
Bob

Collapse -
sans tags

In reply to: font size?

I dont know why my posts are adding the tags...
Thanks for
getting back to me.
Others has
said the same thing, however the cost to run coax is pretty significant
considering it would involve cutting up a decent amount of drywall and perhaps
even coring through the floor
Would putting a Amplifier at the head end (prior) to the conversion to Ethernet help,
or does the impedance factor still to much to overcome?

Collapse -
Those codes

In reply to: sans tags

The codes often happen when folk paste RICH CONTENT. The icon to the right of the smiley face might help.

As to the solution the engineering team would use, I bet they will have to deal with the impedance issue and more. Get a quote.

What is this about "coring"? Here we would use a concrete hammer drill. Cost was some earmuffs and a drill bit.
Bob

Collapse -
Answer
new outside cable??

In reply to: Comcast TV over Ethernet

This was happening in my house.

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