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Chronicle: Fake journalism threatens free press

More propaganda: Fake reporter fits administration's pattern of made-up journalism..
(Chronicle login: semods4@yahoo.com; pw = speakeasy)

>>The practice of buying ostensibly independent reporters and writers to shill for politicians deceives the public and corrupts the free media. Allowing fake reporters to compete with credentialed journalists for sparse press conference time with the leader of the free world demeans the whole process.<<

BTW, they forget another instance -- the commercials touting the Administrations Medicare drug benefit that pretended to be news reports.

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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Comments
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(NT) (NT) Shameful acts by shameless people.
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(NT) (NT) Shame? But it's for THE CAUSE! (You nailed it, bro.)
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Fake

Fake like CNN or Dan (I'm) Rather (biased)

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Oh puh leeze!

As if the "real" journalists that never asked Clinton about Juanita Broaderrick and Helen Thomas that editorializes every rambling question anti-Bush are any different.

Evie Happy

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"Bias"

Did you read the book "Bias"?

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Response
...never asked Clinton about Juanita Broaderrick...

Maybe because they know that continuing to spit out accusations of dubious veracity doesn't make them any more credible, despite the lessons of the Newt manual. I noticed that you never did respond to this post of mine, from the last time you brought up Juanita Broaddrick.
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Give me a break

Reporters have asked Bush about the cocaine allegations even though those are even more baseless than you portray Broaderrick's to be. They pestered him like gnats about the National Guard thing, they barely questioned Kerry. There are far too many examples to list ...

Evie Happy

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Never, LOL

Perhaps Bush wouldn't have been asked about cocaine as many times as he was if he'd just answered the question. His refusal to do so only fueled the fire. You may recall that he only "denied" having used cocaine during a specific period of time (and even that was barely a denial -- all he would say was that he'd have passed a drug test). He would not comment on any time before or after that period. And your statement that the allegations are baseless is just your personal belief, unless you've got some proof you'd like to share.

Be honest now, if John Kerry had been asked the cocaine question and had given the answer that Bush gave, what would you think?

In the Broaddrick case however, there is ample evidence (including legal documents) that the alleged rape never occurred.

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So let me see ...

... Clinton shouldn't have been asked about Broaderrick, but Bush is faulted for being asked because he didn't answer? You're too much sometimes!

Josh, not ONE person willing to come forth and put their name behind the story has made the allegation. Thus they are baseless until a credible source comes forth. Again, I recall you adopting an entirely different stance when rumors of a Kerry affair surfaced.

Evie Happy

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Kerry was asked about that rumor

He denied it emphatically, and the story soon died as it should have.

Surely you can understand why people wouldn't want to come forward and admit to having committed a crime. But I do recall reading at least one story in which people claimed to have seen Bush use cocaine.

Again -- when the Broaddrick story surfaced, the evidence available shot it down pretty quickly. Clinton was never asked about the baby he was supposed to have fathered by a hooker either (and you might remember that the hooker later admitted that she was paid to make that claim).

When Clinton was asked if he'd ever smoked pot, he offered a Bush-esque "denial," saying only that he'd never violated US laws. But the interviewer pressed the question and that's when he sheepishly gave the famous "I didn't inhale and I didn't like it" reply.

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Evie I am sorry to say that there is a difference between

"bias" and accepting $$$$$$$$'s for reporting something which may not even be news.
Corruption,not bias is what we are talking about here and no matter who benefits from it it is still fraud for money!

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(NT) (NT) The guy asked a question!
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commercials touting....

commercials touting the Administrations Medicare drug benefit....
Was it not The AARP commercial that started by saying that the new Medicare drug benefit is "a good Start."???
...with AARP?s endorsement." An AARP commercial pushing for passage of the bill stated, "While it?s not perfect we know there are millions of Americans who can?t afford to wait for perfect."

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Hi, K.

You'll note that the AARP now has a new head, and a new view towards that "benefit." But either way, their commercials on the isue were clearly labelled as such.
OTOH, Mock News on Medicare Called Illegal by the General Accounting Office, no less. (The piece is a linked quote to an LA Times story at the time that's no longer available for free).

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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Morning

Why not toot your horn that the commercials job?

Medicare chief Mark McClellan sharply disputes those charges, pointing to a new Consumers Union and California Health Care Foundation survey finding that many of the Medicare discount cards are producing prices lower than Medi- Cal, California's health care program for the poor, offers.
That survey, which included San Francisco, found that for seniors without drug insurance and large drug costs, "the cards are worth a close look."
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AARP, formerly the American Association of Retired Persons, released a study showing that drug prices rose at three times the rate of inflation in the first three months this year, negating the card discounts.
Although analysts point out that the AARP study is misleading because all health care costs have been far outpacing inflation for years -- discount card or no discount card -- the bad publicity has not helped the cards' popularity.
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Yet the irony is that new studies are showing the drug card is saving substantial money for seniors who do not have drug insurance -- particularly poor seniors.
"This discount card is kind of strange to me," said Jeff Lemeiux, executive director of Centrist.org, a nonpartisan think tank. "Democrats have been complaining that the discounts aren't big enough, but I think people are actually finding the discounts are pretty good."
About 70 private companies were approved by Medicare to provide cards to seniors who sign up, offering various discounts on most prescription drugs. Low-income seniors -- defined as those with $12,569 in annual income for a single person and $16,862 for a married couple -- who have no drug insurance get an additional $600 annual subsidy.

Political motivated talking points or the big pitcher?

National Council on the Aging (www.ncoa.org)
"If this bill is not passed now, seniors could have to wait many more years for meaningful prescription drug coverage.

Alzheimer's Association (www.alz.org)
"The Alzheimer's Association applauds congressional leadership on achieving a compromise on Medicare prescription drug benefit legislation.

American Diabetes Association (www.diabetes.org)
"The American Diabetes Association is pleased that the Medicare reform legislation pending before Congress contains important improvements to the Medicare program that will benefit many people living with or at risk for diabetes."

Catholic Health Association (www.chausa.org)
"The Catholic health ministry applauds congressional leaders and members of the Medicare conference committee in moving the nation closer to historic legislation to provide a prescription drug benefit and reform Medicare."

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