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China shoots down satellite

by caktus / January 18, 2007 4:05 PM PST

Chinese Anti-Satellite [ASAT] Capabilities
On 17 January 2007 Craig Covault, writing in Aviation Week & Space Technology, reported that China conducted a successful anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons test at about 5:28 p.m. EST on 11 January 2007. A kinetic kill vehicle launched by a medium range ballistic missile destroyed an inactive Chinese weather satellite. The Chinese Feng Yun 1C (FY-1C) polar orbiting meterological satellite had been launched in 1999. The ASAT was launched from or near the Xichang Space Center, and intercepted the target at an altitude of variously reported as either 530 or 537 miles. This altitude is consistent with the operational altitudes of American and Japanese imagery intelligence satellites.
more....

Perhaps we should have kept working on SDI. Maybe Reagan had the right idea after all.

Disclaimer--No proselytizing or politicing intended.

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(NT) Nice shot!
by JP Bill / January 18, 2007 7:31 PM PST
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don't fret, yet : "Air Force Doctrine Document 2-2.1"
by WOODS-HICK / January 18, 2007 9:50 PM PST

".........Air Force Doctrine Document 2-2.1: Counterspace Operations" is an apparent first-cut at detailing how U.S. forces might take out an enemy's space capabilities -- and protect America's eyes and ears in orbit. Signed by Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. John Jumper, the unclassified report sketches out who would be in command during a space fight, what American weapons would be used, and which targets might be attacked.........(more)"
http://www.defensetech.org/archives/001133.html

"In the late 1970s an USA anti-satellite (ASAT) mission evolved for the F-15 Eagle........

.....The first and only ASM-135A launch against an actual target satellite took place on September 13, 1985, when F-15A 77-0084 of the 6512th Test Squadron stationed at Edwards AFB took off from Vandenberg AFB and zoom-climbed up to 80,000 feet and then launched the ASAT against the Solwind P78-1, a gamma ray spectroscopy satellite that had been launched in February of 1979. Both the first and second stages fired successfully, and the miniature kinetic kill vehicle separated and homed in on the satellite, destroying it upon impact..........

......Solar scientists were not happy about the test either, since although the Solwind P78-1 that was killed had officially completed its mission, it was still sending back useful data.........(more)"

http://www.patricksaviation.com/wiki/F-15_ASAT


the usa might not want to miss a payment on the loans from china

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reply to: don't fret, yet
by caktus / January 19, 2007 1:36 AM PST

I wonder if our response would be fast enough.

BTW, I wonder if John was a Jumper.

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the general population never knows what is being
by WOODS-HICK / January 19, 2007 11:47 PM PST

developed, researched or tested. I think of the >>>lockheed sr-71 blackbird,<<< that was developed and deployed almost decades before ordinary citizens knew about it.

ufo's are most likely advanced weaponry tests, otherwise one has to ask why the 'alien' space ship never lands in the middle of a major city, do they only want to probe arboreal drunks found in the misty woods.


after I saw the general's name (jumper) I did do a google because I thought my link maybe was bogus. he is a jumper.

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reply
by caktus / January 22, 2007 4:16 AM PST

I sometimes wonder about these UFO's that are seen by so many, with the exception of the [official] government.

I still have a problem understanding Congress' reasoning for canning the SR-71 because it carries no weaponry since it was so fast that nothing could touch it. Sounds like it was [pretty good] for recon.

Actually, I was wondering it Jumper was a para-trooper.

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re: reply
by WOODS-HICK / January 22, 2007 5:30 AM PST
In reply to: reply

the "[official] government" might know who and what they are. I lean mostly towards advanced technology testing, including non-military. I also can not believe that we are the only beings capable of space travel. unless we are 'that special' and we can not discuss that.

the official reason is that satellites have superseded the sr-71 mission. the air force always wants to have direct human involvement so I would think there is secret 'replacement' that still comes down to earth. the sr-71 is an amazing aircraft.

I do not know the bio of gen. jumper. pilots (ejection), crew and AF special forces are parachute trained. I think the AF main mission is to not jump out of perfectly good aircraft. they prefer to ride and bring them back to the garage.

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sr71 replacement ?
by WOODS-HICK / January 28, 2007 10:47 PM PST
In reply to: reply
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A remote-controlled SR-71
by Diana Forum moderator / January 28, 2007 11:16 PM PST
In reply to: sr71 replacement ?

2010 is right around the corner for the SLV but 2025 is a ways away for the others. Wonder what the purpose is of outing it now? Scare our enemies and allies?

Diana

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(NT) Thanks Bill.
by Kiddpeat / January 18, 2007 9:52 PM PST
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(NT) he is canadian, he did not shoot the satellite
by WOODS-HICK / January 18, 2007 9:55 PM PST
In reply to: Thanks Bill.
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(NT) I give credit, where credit is due.
by JP Bill / January 18, 2007 10:54 PM PST
In reply to: Thanks Bill.
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I have a question.
by Angeline Booher / January 19, 2007 1:38 AM PST

I know that satellites, etc., travel at a high rate of speed in orbit.

What I don't know.... does a rocket-fired missile travel any faster, and does it have to go into orbit first before taking aim at it's target? Or is it just aimed directly at the target?

Thanks.

Angeline
Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email
semods4@yahoo.com

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As to the latter...
by Angeline Booher / January 19, 2007 3:48 AM PST
In reply to: Some Info

.... it's not surprising to me as it is common for the "first" try at such hi-tech programs to fail. Of course, to know if it was just failure, or a "sneak attack" may never be known. It could have collided with space junk.

As to the former, I did not know about the lasers. Maybe they would be easier and more accrate.

Regardless, I am saving your links for future reference. I have a lot to learn.

Thanks!!!

Angeline
Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email
semods4@yahoo.com

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After exploring some of the links
by JP Bill / January 19, 2007 3:53 AM PST
In reply to: As to the latter...

UPDATE 11:42 AM: Why would Beijing pull a stunt like this? The China Matters blog has a theory. Meanwhile, one keen space-watcher notes that, if this anti-sat weapon was really "kinetic" -- i.e., hit-to-kill, non-explosive -- instead of a plain ol' exploding weapon, that's extremely bad news. That means the booster rocket has to be very accurate "in order to deliver the kill vehicle to the desired initial trajectory.... Then the kill vehicle needs to tweak its trajectory into a precise collision course using on-board propulsion and either on-board target tracking or... command guidance from the ground." That's no mean task.

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Do you think.....
by Angeline Booher / January 19, 2007 6:54 AM PST

.... that they actually could tweak the "journey: so precisely, or was it just blind good luck?

If they can be so accurate, it's not a pleasant thought.

I'm not sure, though, that they didn't spin the story to their advantage. I don't know if the West was able to verify their report.

Angeline
Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email
semods4@yahoo.com

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reply
by caktus / January 19, 2007 9:15 AM PST
In reply to: As to the latter...

Or maybe we're just being [lead] to believe it's out of action. After all, they don't let [everyone] into the know regarding everything. Call it plausible deniability.

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Good point.
by Angeline Booher / January 19, 2007 11:22 PM PST
In reply to: reply

I heard some comments on TV that they are sending out the message that they are in a space race "for peaceful purposes", and their timing could be spawned by the US being involved in 2 wars, so otherwise occupied.

Angeline
Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email
semods4@yahoo.com

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Maybe I read it here
by marinetbryant / January 23, 2007 1:19 PM PST
In reply to: I have a question.

It was said that the satellite was only 500 miles up and in a geo-synchronous orbit. It would probably be like hitting a moving target at 500 yds with a rifle, difficult but not as impossible as some might think.

Tom

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SDI is a whole different problem. Rendezvous with satellites
by Ziks511 / January 22, 2007 7:40 AM PST

have been done since the 60's, this is just an aggressively lethal rendezvous. The satellite tracks are established and predictable. Ballistic missile tracks are each new, unique, and not predictable, and MIRV combined with decoys requires a massive redundancy of shoot-down capacity, even assuming a 100% success rate.

Yes it could be done, but is Global Nuclear War survivable or worth surviving considering the consequences in radiation and climate change.

Terrorism is a greater threat, and nuclear terrorism is more likely than Global Thermonuclear War.

I don't think the US has revealed its capability in this area simply because it's easy to do, and the US could do it on virtually a moment's notice with delivery vehicles at hand. The US has nearly 50 years of practice in space, China on the other hand has much to prove as a new space power, and this is a spectacular stunt. But that's all it is, a stunt.

That's my opinion anyway,

Rob

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China says it tested weapon but still opposes arms race
by Brent Welch / January 23, 2007 7:44 AM PST

Last Updated: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 | 11:53 AM ET
CBC News

China confirmed on Tuesday that it carried out an anti-satellite weapons test earlier this month but said it has no plans to take part in an international space arms race.

China used a missile on Jan. 11 to destroy an old weather satellite located about 865 kilometres above the Earth. According to U.S. intelligence reports, China tested a ground-based medium-range missile.

Foreign Ministry spokesperson Liu Jianchao, in China's first official comment on the test, said China continues to uphold the "peaceful use of outer space" and is demonstrating a "responsible attitude" by providing an explanation for its activities.

"China opposes the weaponization of space and any arms race," Liu said at a regular briefing of reporters in Beijing. "The test is not targeted at any country and will not threaten any country."

Liu declined to say why China did not speak out earlier.

http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2007/01/23/china-confirmation.html

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