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Chelsea calls Mom on the carpet

and gets a public apology....cool kid. You'd almost think she was one of GWB's kids instead. lol

http://www.google.com/url?q=http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12591415/&sa=X&oi=news&ct=result&cd=1

The msnbc link is regarding the work ethic comment Hillary made against young people.

http://www.washtimes.com/national/20040106-103404-4183r.htm

http://www.command-post.org/oped/2_archives/009416.html

The above two links are regarding comments Hillary made about Ghandi.....This woman has a bad habit of inserting her foot into her mouth and having to publicly apologize afterward; and if GWB mis-pronounces a word like nuclear, he's smeared all over the place for it. He may not get the pronunciation correct every time but at least he doesn't have to apologize for insulting people all the time.

Lots of reactive responses at the command-post link that are right on target.

Please God.....don't let this woman even get close to the White House again. The Dems are convinced that the only way to deal with the world is via diplomacy....but then spotlight a possible candidate for the Presidency who doesn't know what that word means. Hillary scares the bejeezus out of me.

TONI

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(NT) (NT) de is laughing all the way to the polls at the dems

In reply to: Chelsea calls Mom on the carpet

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She frankly had nothing to apologize for.

In reply to: Chelsea calls Mom on the carpet

We don't have kids, but I've seen this in the students I teach. They expect to start out life with the same level of comfort ("things") that took their parents 20-30 years to accumulate, and by observation the work ethic is definitely lower than for my generation. it may be impolitic to say that, but it's the truth!

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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Sometimes DK you

In reply to: She frankly had nothing to apologize for.

totally disgust me with your total assessment of our youth. You are so far out of touch with reality that it amazes me. Compare the kids of today with the kids of the 60's and you'll just maybe see the difference in their attitudes and abilities. I'm beginning to suspect that when you were hired, they were scraping the bottom of the barrel, too and just haven't found a replacement for you yet....and when they do, you can bet it will be one of those kids without work ethics, right?

TONI

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(NT) (NT) Bitter pills dispensed and taken 6AM EST.

In reply to: Sometimes DK you

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when the shoe fits

In reply to: (NT) Bitter pills dispensed and taken 6AM EST.

and its fitting dks attitude about kids i dont have a problem

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On this I have to side with DK ...

In reply to: Sometimes DK you

... on balance, the kids these days have been raised in a "participation is all that's needed for success" culture, and expect everything without working for it. They expect the high $$ job on graduation, along with all the niceties of life. That IS a sweeping generalization, but it is fairly accurate "on average" (as they say).

That said, someone oughta tell Hillary that W-O-R-K actually IS a 4 letter word Wink

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Toni, I see the difference in work ethic

In reply to: Sometimes DK you

between most of today's grad students (who tend to work "regular hours") and the hours we worked back in the 70's (I missed most of the hit TV shows in the 70's because I was always in the lab). My wife has made the same comment about a poorer work ethic in the younger employees where she works, and has heard similar complaints from colleagues when she goes to professional meetings. As I recall, you aren't currently in the corporate work force, so on what do you base your attack?

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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My husband ...

In reply to: Toni, I see the difference in work ethic

... just had to let go the second of two recent hires. They KNOW they are on a 90-day probationary period (or it may be 6 months) and yet each had two unexcused call-outs within the first MONTH of getting hired! They've gotten away with this sort of thing all along -- my students expect "extra credit" for essentially attending all of the required classes!

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My attack

In reply to: Toni, I see the difference in work ethic

with the wording of 'bottom of the barrel' was reflective of your assessment of our military, DK...however, since I am considered by you to not have a basis to form an opinion about the work ethics of the youth today because I am no longer in the corporate picture is comparable to your having an opinion on military actions and decisions when you have no first hand experience either.

How's it feel to have your words bite you, DK?

I may not be in the work force publicly anymore since I work out of my home in a field that doesn't get alot of kids contacting me or interacting with me, but I have dealt with quite a few regarding their computers and how they use them for college classes because they really do have a solid career and future planned out for themselves. I also have been in contact with many of Derek's friends on a personal level and most of them are the same way. They may not have college in their backgrounds, but they work in construction, factories, landscaping businesses, etc. and they actually show up every day and work hard physically knowing that any kind of job is hard to come by and in this community at least, once you HAVE a job, you wouldn't be able to replace it very easily. Nobody here looks for a handout....it might be the environment they grew up in where physical hard labor was and still is an every day occurance when you are in a farming community.

We have our fair share of losers....every place has them...but there are far fewer here than some people think even with all my jokes about hillbillies.

TONI

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Toni...you're comments on "Bottom of the Barrel"...you are,

In reply to: My attack

...EXACTLY RIGHT ON TARGET...BULLSEYE

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Are you sure about that ...

In reply to: Chelsea calls Mom on the carpet

You'd almost think she was one of GWB's kids instead.

Perhaps my memory is faulty, or maybe I wasn't listening at the right time. I don't recall ever hearing a real public apology from GWB. I've heard a couple of near-miss attempts at apologies, but that's about it. Of course, I've been accused of senility with some regularity (mostly by my teenage son!)

I'm not a Hillary fan, but I do have to respect that fact that she was willing to apologize.

Whether she SHOULD have to apologize for criticizing our young people's alleged desire for instant gratification is harder to say. There clearly are young people who don't know the meaning of work. Whether that is a bigger problem now than it was 40 years ago is unclear to me.
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Compared even to my generation, there is Dr. Bill ...

In reply to: Are you sure about that ...

... although there ARE always exceptions to every rule. Like all young kids, we "knew it all" too, etc., but there was no sense of entitlement that these kids have today. I think it's directly related to the "self esteem preservation" culture of today's education system. That was only coming in vogue after I had already escaped the education system.

Evie Happy

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A vast majority of the kids

In reply to: Compared even to my generation, there is Dr. Bill ...

in the 60's were going to college on parent's funding only to party hearty and protest on campus with sit in's while higher than kites most of the time. Many were also living in communes on welfare money.

TONI

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I'm speaking of the kids who

In reply to: A vast majority of the kids

weren't already in the service as another means of avoiding the draft when I say "majority"......

TONI

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It's no different now!

In reply to: A vast majority of the kids

Except they expect the taxpayer to subsidize it now.

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I would add ...

In reply to: It's no different now!

... that while many of my students definitely come from privileged backgrounds, equally many come from "disadvantaged" backgrounds. Surprisingly, it is often the latter that feels more entitled to get a better grade for "trying" and a good paying job upon graduation. They feel they go to college, I guess, to put them "above" certain stations in life. They are in for rude awakenings, especially those that are getting degrees in bogus impractical subjects like "Name-Your-Victim-Group Studies", "General Studies", "Liberal Arts" and so on. Even Psychology, English and History are worthless to major in unless one intends to go on to a Master's in Education or something where they can apply their knowledge or a PhD to go on to teach at the college level.

I think I will be afraid to go to a doctor in about 10-15 years. If the students who claim they want to be doctors are indeed representative of those that go on to become one, I'm VERY afraid. Being a Biology major undergrad, I knew a lot of pre-Meds. While some of them partied as much as the next person, they were all, to a one, highly intelligent and well suited for their chosen field. Many of those that want to go into medicine these days aren't even doing A work at a "B-list" school.

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''Vast majority''???

In reply to: A vast majority of the kids

Do you have some objective support for such a statement?

Dan

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I can see Mrs. Clinton's point.

In reply to: Chelsea calls Mom on the carpet

When my kids worked at Opryland during the season while in High School in the early '70s, both became supervisors. The frustrating part of their responsibilities was that other kids (Opryland was the start of the work experience for teen-agers) from quitting or just not showing up because the work was hard.

High School parking lots looked like dealerships, with many kids driving better cars than their parents had.

The country was coming out of the 60's into the ''Me!'' generation, and it was popoular for parents to be ''friends'' with their kids. Those kids were also attaining ''mini-adult'' status in the eyes of many. I personallly know of some parents who would not tell their kids ''No!'' out of fear their kids would not ''like'' them. It was also the time when more mothers were entering the work force. The divorce rate was lower than today, however. The demand for name-brand clothing and shoes was just entering the picture.

That's how I saw things in my area at that point in time. Today I see what I think has been a growing sense of entitlement by too many kids.

Thus I can understand Mrs. Clinton's views.

As to my views, I would not feel the need to apologize to my children when we differ. But I am not in the political arena.

And I admit that I am the only one on the face on the planet who likes Mrs. Clinton, for which I also do not feel the need to apologize.


Angeline
Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email
semods4@yahoo.com

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Yet another POV

In reply to: I can see Mrs. Clinton's point.

I grew up in Chicago, blue collar brat, attended SWU (sidewalk university) we called it. Became a wage slave at 11. Teenage years began in '61. We had full blown, under desk, air raid drills. Citywide sirens every Tuesday 1030AM. Color codes are just a vote-getter.
My flower child perspective: At 19 you got a birthday card from Uncle Sugar (ie: draft notice). Tear gas for two days in Chicago, 68 DNC (picture USSR). All my friends (-2) served in some branch of military. They were never spit on (I guess they were the only ones who weren't). Luckily all survived. Most are against war.
What else happened in our teenage wasteland? Civil rights,the draft ended(the private army we have now is much more dangerous). We brought the war home (not avoided like it is today). Then we fought for clean air, water, saving the planet, zero population growth. Wore old torn levi's, paisley shirts, head bands, and long hair. Drugs were soft core (cannabis,hash,peyote, magic mushrooms) from the dirt of mother earth. Communes were rare, but communal spirit was not. The golden rule spin-off was 'do your own thing, just don't hurt anyone else'. The old folks thought we were crazy but they recognized their own wild ways. It wasn't so bad and the beat continues.............

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As I am...

In reply to: Yet another POV

....old enough to be your mother with years to spare....:-)

I used to support organizations like Nature Conservancy, Sierra Club, and even Greenpeace in it's whale saving day. (Now on fixed income.) The difference in your approach and mine is that I supported those groups that could actually accomplish the goals I considered important. There were those interested in saving the environment and related issues before the '60s, I guarantee.

There were also quite a few people who could enjoy a sense of community without the aid of drugs.

As mine is a military family, there were several who were veterans of WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. You may not believe this, but no one hates war more than those in the military. They have experienced it. Men and women continue to volunteer to serve for various reasons, whether for the hi-tech schooling they get, for college money, and even from a sense of patriotism.

I never saw any spitting, but did some "Baby killer!" signs. We had a friend who was a POW in 'Nam , and watched him embarking from the plane on TV when a group was released. A great day!

Of my two children, one is in the military. The other had no interest in it, but makes a contribution to society in other ways. IMO, that is what we hope for our children, that they be good citizens and care about others and the world in and on which we live.

Angeline
Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email
semods4@yahoo.com

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and since I respect

In reply to: As I am...

my 90 year old mother who lives with us now, I might in haste left the wrong impression. As so many other 'war babies', my dad, uncles, (one career major), and my namesake Lt.---- --------,US Army Air Corps. He was my mother's brother, P-38 pilot, KIA, (lost in the Bering Sea).
I also served ILANG 66-72 honorable discharge. I have supported the same groups as you plus many more 'respected organizations'. I am now on SSD, fixed income.
You sound like a very nice lady and I do appreciate your son's service. I can not support the Iraq war. War on terror has to be redirected. Have a good day ma'am.

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