Networking & Wireless forum

Question

cat5e vs 802.11ac. dedicated stream throughout

by ajayk78 / June 23, 2013 3:01 AM PDT

Hi,

I have a structured wiring home on cat5e wiring. With the advent of gigabit 802.11ac standard, I was wondering if it makes sense to build a home network lan on cat5e. Both being giga bit, what is the key advantage of going the wired route.

Would a structured wired network provide me with simultaneous multiple dedicated gigabit speed from a central server to different access points in different rooms, whereas a wireless network would have to share the same gigabit bandwidth across all access points for simultaneous multiple streams?

If that is true, i can see that as a big advantage over wireless.

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: cat5e vs 802.11ac. dedicated stream throughout
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: cat5e vs 802.11ac. dedicated stream throughout
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.

All Answers

Collapse -
Answer
I'm sure you figured it out.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 23, 2013 5:03 AM PDT

Multiple access points versus one. Since all WiFi is shared half duplex, by having more access points you do get more wireless throughput.

Bob

Collapse -
PS.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 23, 2013 5:28 AM PDT

Since this is new stuff I didn't think you were asking for vaporware but have some idea on what you have now.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac

So given you have you hardware all ready I thought you may want to know I use the older(?) but available WAPs (or router configured as a WAP) so we don't lose time looking for vaporware.
Bob

Collapse -
Still not sure
by ajayk78 / June 23, 2013 10:31 AM PDT

I guess the more I think about it, both wired cat5e and wireless 802.11ac share the same limitations. A single server connected to the wired LAN through a switch still has to route multiple simultaneous data requests through a single input line and multiple output lines. So in theory the gigabit throughput is split across multiple access points. Maybe there is no strong advantage of wired over wireless, besides the usual security/slightly better performance/reliability etc of wired networks. The advantages of wired don't really justify investing in wiring your home especially with cat5e with 802.11ac standard being ratified soon if you are mainly after throughput. Unless someone strongly disagress with this assessment, I hope this post helps someone else in the same shoes as I am.

Collapse -
Answer
802ac is new. Please fasten seat belts, turbulence ahead.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 25, 2013 10:58 AM PDT
Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

GIVEAWAY

Turn up the volume with our Apple Byte sweeps!

Two lucky winners will take home the coveted smart speaker that lets Siri help you around your connected house. This sweepstake ends Feb. 25, 2018.