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Canon vs. Kodak point & shoot

I'm in the market for a simple point & shoot camera. I'm only wanting to spend $250 to $350 & have narrowed my choices to the Kodak Z1012 & the Canon S5 IS.

They both have 12x optical zoom, but the Kodak is 10MP while the Canon is 8MP, but the Canon is about $50 more. The Canon does have a couple fetures that I like, such as the one button switch to video & the stereo speakers in the front. (I don't have a video cam, so I'll use this quite a bit).

From what I understand(which is very little) Canon has a better reputation for quality than Kodak in general, but I don't really know specificly why.

Can any offer up some opinions on the differences between these two cameras & whether one will hold up longer than the other. Also, is the 2MP difference between the two a really big deal? Thanks in advance!

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yes they usually do

In reply to: Canon vs. Kodak point & shoot

The Kodak that you mentioned is pretty good. The reason Kodak isn't considered that great is because they don't really make good lens. That's why their better cameras are outsourced for lens manufacturing. Canon makes very good lens throughout their lineup. The Kodak have one thing that goes very well for them, they are set up very simply and extremely easy to understand the settings. I had my mother buy a Kodak and she's very happy with it, especially since she's deficient when it comes to electronics.

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Thanks for the response.

In reply to: yes they usually do

What about the 2MP difference between the two? The more expensive Canon in only 8MP while the cheaper Kodak is 10MP. I was under the impression that the two most important features on a point & shoot are MP & optical zoom. Is the Kodak lens really that much worse in this case, that it would be $50 less even though the MP are higher?

Right now I'm leaning towards the Kodak unless someone has some kind of horror stories for me!

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That's a myth

In reply to: Thanks for the response.

Megapixels does not equal higher image quality. That's a myth that is kept going by the increasing megapixel war to make people buy a new camera and it doesn't help when people at Best Buy say the same thing. I could get much higher quality out of a 6MP Nikon DSLR than a 12MP point and shoot. The biggest things that matter, for image quality, is the quality and size of the sensor and the quality of the lens.

Megapixels is the resolution. You can have a high resolution TV, but it can still have a crappy picture. The Polaroid cameras that are 10MP are horrible cameras because of their cheap lens and poor sensor. You can print a 5MP picture to an 8x10 and not tell the resolution difference between it and a 12MP printed to an 8x10. If you're printing a poster then you would see a little difference.

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I should say

In reply to: That's a myth

The Kodak superzooms have usually performed fairly well, but their never part a list of the best superzooms. Since you're new to this then the Kodak might be the right choice, considering it's ease of use and will probably produce good photos. You seem to be leaning that way already.

To help you understand what I'm saying, here is a link to Stevesdigicams.com best cameras for different types of cameras. There is one Kodak in that list, but there are 13 Canon's that made the top list.

http://www.steves-digicams.com/best_cameras.html

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sensor lens quality

In reply to: That's a myth

You mentioned the qualities of the lens and sensor. How does one learn about those qualities? I am also in the market for a new camera and have a budget of $600.00 - $1000.00 for everything including a zoom I hope. I keep trying to be become informed and the more I read the more confused I become.

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It's very confusing

In reply to: sensor lens quality

You pretty much have to go by reviews, look at the samples, and learn about the pros and cons of each. There isn't one camera for everyone, that's why there are so many brands/models that each have their place.

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Thanks again....

In reply to: It's very confusing

There's a lot of info on that site you gave me. It's great, thanks a lot.

The Canon is sounding better & better the more I read.

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thank you

In reply to: It's very confusing

Thank you for your help. Now do you want to go shopping for me?

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Ehh, I would avoid kodak.

In reply to: Canon vs. Kodak point & shoot

Most Kodak zooms I have tested have a slow zoom, low quality sensor, and cheap lens. I would definitely recommend the canon over the Kodak. The Canon's lens is very quick to zoom and focus, and the video quality is nice. I would strongly suggest you take a look at the Panasonic FZ18 if you want quality for under $300. It has a really nice lens (18x optical with IS) and a decent sensor for $288.99 with free shipping from amazon. The Sony H50 is another great choice, but is closer to $400. Just avoid kodak, you can get much better for the same price. Without a great sensor, that 2mp makes no difference.

PS. don't forget that the canon is the only one of these cameras to use AA batteries (and 4 at that).

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If going to spend up to 1000

In reply to: Ehh, I would avoid kodak.

What would you recommend with a $1000.00 budget?

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don't know

In reply to: If going to spend up to 1000

Are you wanting a superzoom, ultra-compact, high end point and shoot, and what features are a must: hot shoe, flippable LCD, image stabilization. etc? What type of shooting are you planning on?

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Nikon

In reply to: If going to spend up to 1000

I have heard most professionals have been switching to Nikons for their quickness and quality. In that price you can get a D80 with an 18-135mm lens from Amazon for just over $1000.

www.amazon.com/Nikon-10-2MP-Digital-18-135mm-Zoom-Nikkor/dp/B000HGIWN4/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1217279202&sr=8-2

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AWESOME

In reply to: Nikon

Thank you so much!!

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Bundle price is good

In reply to: low low price

That bundle is a good price, but that is the d60. The d80 is a much better camera, and only a couple hundred more. He is looking around $1000.

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I haven't heard that

In reply to: Nikon

For quickness the Canons are faster in both FPS and auto-focusing speed. Canon, as of last year, still has 85% of the market with professionals. Nikon has made vast gains overall in the marketplace, but it's mostly with the lower end DSLRs.

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Well..

In reply to: I haven't heard that

Don't get me wrong, the canons are great professional cameras, but mostly in the upper price range. Cnet rated the D80 higher than any canon is the price range and gave it their editor's choice. I also heard a couple of the editors mention on a podcast how most of their friends were switching from canon to nikon. Canons are great, but I think the Nikon D80 is a better camera at this price point. At a professional price point could be a different story.

PS, I think some canons are nicer than the d40 or d60 at their price points.

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go to dpreview or stevesdigicams

In reply to: Well..

The XSI wasn't out when the review of the D80 was done. The D80 cannot beat the XSI or the 40D. I will be interested to see how good the D700 is when the reviews come out. As, much as I like Cnet the reviews of the cameras are not very good compared to dpreview or stevesdigicams.

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alright

In reply to: go to dpreview or stevesdigicams

Ok, i will concede that the XSi is another good choice. It really comes down to user preference.

To recap, for the poster looking for a good camera around $1000. I would get a feel for both before buying.

Nikon D80 with 2 lenses

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-10-2MP-Digital-18-135mm-Zoom-Nikkor/dp/B000HGIWN4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1217346707&sr=1-2

Canon XSi with kit lens

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Digital-Camera-18-55mm-3-5-5-6/dp/B0012YA85A/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1217346485&sr=8-1

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direction plz

In reply to: alright

If I sent any of you my $1000.00 what should I get? I want the fastest best, most for the cheapest. Gently used is ok if you know who gently used it

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it really depends

In reply to: direction plz

If I was spending a $1000 for a camera and not anymore for accessories, then I would by the Canon G9 and buy the 430EXII flash. I wouldn't want to get stuck with a camera, with no external flash, and only one lens. If you're just talking about the camera, then the 40D can be had for under $1000, but it might be too big for you to carry around all the time. Also, I shoot in AV most of the time and understand ISO and exposure.

If you are going to shoot in auto modes then that camera would not be the one for you. You asked what "I" would buy, but the camera is for you and you may know more or less about photography than me. Better equipment won't make you a better photographer and not increase the photos very much if you're just a snap shooter. If you want all auto all the time then the E-510, Canon XS, or Nikon D40 or D60.

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help

In reply to: go to dpreview or stevesdigicams

thank..................what are the difference in cameras you mentioned

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The Digital Rebel XSi

In reply to: If going to spend up to 1000

Since you are asking this question, I assume you are fairly new to this. So I would recommend a low end dSLR like the Digital Rebel Xsi. It comes with an 18-55 IS (Image Stabilized) kit lens for about $899.

The poster above mentioned pros switching to Nikon. While that has been true to some extent lately, that is because of the D3 or D300, which are high end ($$$) cameras. The lower end Nikons do not have the speed or low light quality of the Canon cameras.

But remember, with a dSLR, your investment is more about the glass (lenses) than it is a particular body. In other words you are investing in the "system." Meaning, if you start buying Canon lenses then you are sort of "stuck" with Canon (of course same things holds true with Nikon, Olympus, Sony, etc).

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new camera

In reply to: The Digital Rebel XSi

Thank you...........I am new when it comes to the digital SLR's I had a traditional 35mm but it was stolen and I miss having a camera. My thought originally was going toward a point and shoot digital like in the $500 price range. This was going to be small enough for my purse but with a zoom etc. Then I decided to go with a digital slr. Thank you for your input and time.

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Olympus' new option

In reply to: new camera

The new Olympus Evolt E-520 just got a 4.5/5 from a review site. That camera is worth a try too. Its cheap enough that you could buy the kit, a panoramic lens, high speed CF card and case all for under $1000.

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Olympus

In reply to: Olympus' new option

Thank you............with the panoramic lens that sounds perfect.!! Landscape and cars will be awesome

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question

In reply to: Olympus' new option

I'm not that involved with Olympus lens, but what is a "panoramic" lens? I've never heard of such a lens. There is a panorama function on the E-510 and it has mixed reviews of how well it works.

http://www.flickr.com/groups/e510/discuss/72157605775523510/

I've had good use of the Canon G2's panoramic stitching software and mode on the camera. I've only used it a few times because nobody prints them. It would have to be a special order which would've made it expensive.

The Canon A-series cameras have panorama features on the cameras and has been around for many years.

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dang it

In reply to: question

Kalel, just wondering but do you enjoy making me look dumb? Silly

I blew it, I meant a telephoto lens, you caught me. I always mix up those 4 syllable photography words.

BTW, for the person we are debating this stuff for, have you done any other research or gotten any hands-on experience yet. That is really the most important thing to do.

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I wasn't meaning to make you look stupid

In reply to: dang it

I researched online and couldn't find anything on a telephoto lens. I just learned about the Lens Baby lens and was wondering if there was something new out? The only thing I found was the panorama function. I think the Olympus does really well, especially for the size.

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see I made a mistake too when looking back

Meant to say panoramic lens instead of telephoto.

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