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Question

Cannot Remove XP's Dual-Boot From Windows 10

Windows 10 upgrading went well and smooth and I love it.

On this laptop, I had a dual-boot I forgot to remove in Windows 7 before upgrading to Windows 10. I don't need the XP's dual booting anymore. My dilemma is the XP's boot logging is missing in the System Configuration to remove. It only shows in the Setup And Recovery dialog box.

How can I remove the dual-boot function so as to have only Windows 10 in the system?

I tried both PhotoBucket and Flickr to copy a URL for the photos but both are not working well for me. Just feels too complicated for such a simple request. So, am just going to explain myself enough here:

1. During boot, the black screen shows the Windows 10 and Windows XP as selection, while 10 is the default boot.
2. STARTUP AND RECOVERY: Here, both Windows 10 and Windows XP are in the selection window, under DEFAULT OPERATING SYSTEMS.
3. SYSTEM CONFIGURATION: Here only " Windows 10 (C:\WINDOWS) : Current OS; Default OS " shows in the BOOT tab window. XP is missing to delete.
4. I still have the Windows XP partition.

Thanks.

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All Answers

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Answer
From what I've seen it will blow up the installed OSes.

In reply to: Cannot Remove XP's Dual-Boot From Windows 10

I'd start over. Wipe the drive, boot your Windows 10 DVD and do it again.

Yes, you'll want to print out any and all license keys before you start as well as make an image of this drive so you can go back.

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(NT) This Will Be My Last Resort If I Have To.

In reply to: From what I've seen it will blow up the installed OSes.

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But why bother,

In reply to: This Will Be My Last Resort If I Have To.

how much space have it taken up especially Hdd. are so inexpensive nowaday.

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Answer
delete the XP partition

In reply to: Cannot Remove XP's Dual-Boot From Windows 10

then reboot.

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Answer
No doubt Bob's solution is safest, but most labor intensive.

In reply to: Cannot Remove XP's Dual-Boot From Windows 10

James' solution would be the easiest, but before deleting that XP Partition, I'd get hold of EasyBCD and remove it from the BCD (I think BCD stands for Boot Configuration Data). Then Windows 10 would be able to boot up without looking for that XP partition, at least in theory. I'll quickly add that I've never just deleted a bootable partition because I'm not that much of a risk taker. What I've always done is to make sure the partition I want to boot from is the default, then deleted the Program Files and Windows folders from the partition I no longer want to use. After that I use Easeus Partition Master to resize what's left of the XP partition and reclaim the space for the one I'm going to use. Different strokes, but that's what has worked for me on numerous occasions.
Since MS made booting more complicated with that BCD, I lean on the cautious side. And I feel to say I'd NEVER do any of this without making 1 or 2 complete system backups. Murphy loves folks who get in a hurry!

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I Completely Forgot About EasyBCD - That's What I Used

In reply to: No doubt Bob's solution is safest, but most labor intensive.

I took a chance without backing up the drive because I had upgraded to a larger drive and still have the smaller drive with Windows 7 (I can clone back to the larger drive and re-install Windows 10).

Need:
1. Need to keep all my apps since I already have them the way I would like.
2. Have handful of nice utilities I have gotten from Giveawayoftheday.com.

EasyBCD:
1. Installed EasyBCD 2.2 Community Edition (Free Edition. Donation optional).
2. In Edit Boot Menu, remove the Windows XP entry.
3. Saved settings.
4. Closed EasyBCD.

Easeus PartitionMaster 10.2
1. Deleted the Windows XP partiton.
2. Reclaimed the space from XP and added to my DATA partition.
3. "Apply" for the requests to run.
4. Selected to Shut Down the PC after the action had completed.

Window 10 Boot
Window 10 booted well, no errors and no Windows XP selection option.
Rebooted three more times, all went well.

Thanks all for all your suggestions.
OkaM

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Answer
may help

In reply to: Cannot Remove XP's Dual-Boot From Windows 10

have 10.1 (assume build 14393.222) on a pen-drive or disk ready
backup please.
(4. I still have the Windows XP partition.) delete this partition then format it.
done space recovered.
boot to win 10 pen-drive or disk, and choose repair options try
Automatic repair
This should scan and hopefully repair your boot.
Similar process to older OSes (like win 98)

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