Question

Camera

May 29, 2017 10:56AM PDT

What is best first digital camera

Looking at Nikon b500 or Nikon d3400

Wanting something good to start but not break the bank

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Answer
Camera
May 30, 2017 11:24AM PDT

Interesting comparison.
If you want a family camera, the B500 will do the job.

If you want to get involved with photography, choose the D3400.

You will find that the D3400 does much better in low light situations because it has a much larger sensor assembly.

Here is a detailed comparison:
http://cameradecision.com/compare/Nikon-Coolpix-B500-vs-Nikon-D3400

Joe

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Answer
"best first digital camera" usually = cellphone
May 31, 2017 2:07AM PDT

See my previous posts:

https://www.cnet.com/forums/discussions/any-recommendation-for-camera/#post-6361bb1f-327e-480f-b394-1a6100f707fb

and later in that same thread:

https://www.cnet.com/forums/discussions/any-recommendation-for-camera/#post-3c1516cf-279b-4ba9-bbbf-eec6cd68604b

That said, the main reason to pick a superzoom like the D500 is because you need a superzoom. i.e. 40X, 22.5-900mm (full frame equivalent).

The main reason to buy an interchangeable lens camera like the D3400 is because you plan (and have the budget) to buy several lenses for different types of photography. i.e. a long zoom for wildlife, a bright prime for low light, a macro for, well, macro, etc.

And that gets back to what I said in the second post linked above:

"use the cellphone to find out which certain types of photos you want to take that the cellphone won't capture well."

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