Question

Best modern camcorder to re-film old 8mm movies

Need HD camcorder (late-model) recommendation to re-film old 8mm (Super Cool celluloid movies. Camcorder should have: manual focus, manual shutter-speed, manual iris, manual white balance controls?

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Answer
The problem is

You might compare this to pro frame by frame conversions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLgQ3RQPcvk kicks around the TELECINE METHOD (you can google that) but it's not so much the camcorder but the setup, the stability of the camcorder tripod and if your camcorder can change frame rates.

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Here's a review of a frame by frame digitizer.
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Best modern camcorder to re-film old 8mm movies

Option of using Wolverine 1080p is possible - but 200 roll warranty limit suggests that Wolverine does not expect longevity.

Others have noted that the normal movie projector sprocket is replaced on Wolverine by a pin/pull through mechanism, prone to snagging at splices etc? Moviestuff telecine (Cadillac!) avoids possible film damage by using NO spockets at all !

Also, I believe Wolverine digital is in MP4 form? ie compressed. Ideally, I would like AVI for editing.

I have approximately 25 hrs of celluloid to transfer = 25000 ft or 500 3-minute rolls . . . so I might need 3 or 4 Wolverines!

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Best modern camcorder to re-film old 8mm movie

The suggested YouTube movie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLgQ3RQPcvk seems to be using a DSLR (which I don't have).

I was really looking for advice on modern HD camcorder with necessary manual features for correct shutter speed (1/60), manual focus, manual aperture, and manual white balance which others have reported is the minimum to re-film successfully? Stability of tripod, and avoidance of keystone effect are important - as well as a variable-speed projector to synchronise frame rate and avoid "beats".

Still looking.

The other option of using Wolverine 1080p is possible - but 200 roll warranty limit suggests that Wolverine does not expect longevity. Others have noted that the normal movie projector sprocket is replaced on Wolverine by a pin/pull through mechanism, prone to snagging at splices etc? Moviestuff telecine (Cadillac!) avoids possible film damage by using NO spockets at all !

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There are too many good camcorders.

I never debate BEST and use DSLR and now smart phones instead of camcorders. Heretic!

You are getting the same information I have on frame by frame conversion but I'm calling the dis of the Wolverine about compression and such "nope" as the more examples I see the more I see that frame by frame wins over telecine methods.

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Best modern camcorder to re-film old 8mm movie

R Profitt: The question was not which is the best camcorder? It was ""Best modern camcorder to re-film old 8mm movie" I do not intend to purchase a DSLR and smartphone is inappropriate for re-filming/preserving celluloid movies. Great answer to the wrong question.

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Low Light performance

Assuming you have a similar setup to me when I was recording my Grandfathers 16mm on to Hi-8. A Projector, a screen and a camcorder all aligned.
I found that a matt white screen was the best as then there was no "sparkle" from a glass bead screen. I used a camera with a good low light performance to compensate for the lower reflection from a matt screen.
It worked OK but was still a compromise. There was no problem aligning frames and speeds or from lack of manual focus - it worked as I expected and produced a viewable result.
Now I would use my HC-V800 as this cam has very good low light performance and I would let the camera do all the work. In this case practical experimentation would be the key.

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I've yet to see a low light issue.

Those projectors kick out a ton of light. What some what is better results than the source material which is a discussion on its own. There are two methods to do this work which is telecine and frame by frame.

I've always seen frame by frame win in quality of the transfer. For the audio transfer a sound booth works well.

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