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Be careful about Microsoft : a selling software company.

Be careful about Microsoft : a selling software company.
Be careful with this company. If the motheboard they don't sell breaks and you replace it with a different one, you lose the license OEM of his Windows.
You will only lose a 100-odd euro.

But in addition, it will be after a long string of phone calls, protests, and problems with a robot-like, depersonalized service. Luckily, there are a growing number of alternatives in response to these attitudes.

Perhaps we live in times in which advertisement is more powerful than the customer, but it is up to us, the customers, to put on the record the treatment received by this corporation - to my mind a bad company.

That's up to them, because while they plans its stories and cons to obtain large benefits from clients, the alternatives also continue to grow, and they will start losing quota from those fed up with their attitude.

Farewell Microsoft.

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Just wondering.

In reply to: Be careful about Microsoft : a selling software company.

Why did you use an OEM license if you wanted the better Retail version?

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Just wondering II (2) . . .

In reply to: Be careful about Microsoft : a selling software company.

Farewell Microsoft? Do you mean Microsoft is crashing and going away, or that you will never buy their products?

I didn't know they don't sell motherboards. Ummm, what have I missed in that sentence? MS does not sell motherboards.

Just wondering. MS employs thousands of employees, creates software that is used by the entire world (fault them for that), gets pissed off when someone tries to pirate their work, gets pissed off when someone tries to clone, and or steal their work, and users like you complain when their license runs afoul of your needs?

Give me a break.

Don't like their software? Don't buy it. Want a bigger/better license, buy the full version. Don't complain.

Want a better OS? Design one.

Geez.

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Don't worry

In reply to: Just wondering II (2) . . .

I will never buy again under abusive licenses.

The employees will get a better job.

And I am sure better software is ready for sale under normal conditions.

I think Microsoft and similar conditions are abusive.

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Woud they be more abusive to ...

In reply to: Don't worry

Force everyone to pay an OS TAX? That is, many of us enjoy the savings the OEM license gives us. We are willing to trade dollars for a restrictive license. Are you saying that there should be a tax on the rest of us that don't want such a license?

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Linux: Use it

In reply to: Be careful about Microsoft : a selling software company.

Seems like most computers in stores sells Microsoft Windows, and most likely yours or mines motherboards is not going to break anytime soon (unless we start tampering with it). Its going to stay in the market unless people gets tech savvy.
If you have problems with money of Windows (which does lead to licenses) and replacing your OS, then use the next best thing: Linux. Third world countries use it, its available everywhere, and best of all its open source and free!

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The full story

In reply to: Be careful about Microsoft : a selling software company.

I'm sure if you provide *all* the details your experience could be better explained. As for MS, if you sold a zillion OSes to people across the world, a personal response could be explained as very unlikely until you run the gauntlet of the automated support systems.

tada -----Willy Happy

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The OS licence is tied to the Hardware profile

In reply to: The full story

What the OP is saying is that the OS licence is tied to the hardware profile, and when that profile changes, you have to re-authorize installation of the OS. This can occur by making an image of your harddrive and then replacing the original harddrive and trying to reinstall the image on the new harddrive. It can also happen if your motherboard gets fried and you replace the motherboard. I don't think it will occur if you replace a video card.

It also sounds like the OP is replacing the mobo himself. I think that most manufacturers would take care of the re-authorization when replacing a mobo.

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Yes and No

In reply to: The OS licence is tied to the Hardware profile

No system brand was ever given in the original post. No mention of the type of OEM OS, etc.. While a mtrbd. was replaced was it on a brand system or DIY type or 3rd party, etc. There are various versions of OEM s/w, so it relies on how it was gotten. That's why I mention, the "the full/whole story" in that those details provide a better picture of what the user is up against. Even so, in most DIY installs re-registering can be done. i can only *assume* that a branded system had a new mtrbd. installed not supported by that brand. The EULA doesn't skip on these matters its explained.

tada -----Willy Happy

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As stated below...

"It also sounds like the OP is replacing the mobo himself. I think that most manufacturers would take care of the re-authorization when replacing a mobo"

Teniveri- have you tried contacting your manufacturer about this issue? Because your OEM version of Windows can only be used on the computer it was initially installed in, changing out parts of the hardware yourself can require you to reactivate Windows.

Here is also an FAQ on the matter to read through: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-vista/quick-start/activation-faq.aspx

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Ease of use

In reply to: As stated below...

In general I don't like the way MS ties the registration to the hardware. I find it restrictive, but I understand it. At least I don't have to worry about a dongle. I have installed my Retail Win XP OS so many times on my computer that I have to call in to re-authorize.

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Abuse

In reply to: Ease of use

I hope MS change.

It must be limits in all this.

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