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audio 'jack' terminology

I?m researching the use of the term ?jack? and how it is applied as a name of a connector. From my education in electronics, a jack is a female type of connector; as opposed to the term plug, which is a male type connector. Some people use the word ?jack? as a common name for both male AND female connectors.
There seems to be quite different use between European and American use of this terminology.
Can you shed any light on this subject?

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you are correct

In reply to: audio 'jack' terminology

Who are "some people"? Maybe they just don't know the difference.

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audio 'jack' terminology

In reply to: audio 'jack' terminology

'some people' are actually many people. On eBay the word jack (on audio connector listings) is used as a type of audio connector NOT related to its gender. It's used the same as 'RCA' connector, 'XLR' connector, ie. 'audio jack' connector. Even if the connector is a plug!! Th term audio jack is becoming the standard term for what is a TRS or TS plug, both 1/8" and 1/4".
I'm trying to uncover the reason for this missapplication of electronic nomenclature.

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definately confusing

In reply to: audio 'jack' terminology

They maybe trying to describe the connection being made instead
of what the actual cable connectors are. I'm sure the blueprints
being used to fabricate the cables are described differently.
I guess the description is for general public understanding.

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Common Use Rules in US

In reply to: audio 'jack' terminology

I am not sure of UK standards but in the US "common use" is what tends to define how a word it used and what it means in the general public.

In this case, as in many with technical and engineering terms, the pubilc and sellers end up through common use defining a generic term such as "jack" and "plug" from a specific reference on the technical side. This for most just means they have to read or look at the end to see what they are getting, I have often seen references to a female or male "jack" and "plug" and connector.

Technically your use is correct.

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The is a lot of slang involved

In reply to: Common Use Rules in US

XLR connectors are referred to by male or female.
The 1/4" Phone connector has been around for a very long time. The "Phone" is shortened from telephone connector that was developed back in the early days of the telephone. The operator would complete a call by plugging the male phone connector(plug) into the Phone female connector (jack). I can't imagine were they got the concept Happy

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audio 'jack' terminology

In reply to: The is a lot of slang involved

Below is the reply from a seller on eBay to a message explaining the correct use of plug and jack.
>>
Have fun finding many items listed with TS over jack. TS just isn't used to describe that type of connection whether its "technical" the name for it or not.
Search 3.5mm TS and see 7 results. Search 3.5mm jack and see 2745 results.

I've been buying and selling jack connectors for years in the USA and UK and never once have I heard them been referred to as a TS connection.
<<

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OK more info!

In reply to: audio 'jack' terminology

1/4 phone plugs/jacks can come in different configurations.
The most common is the two conductor, such as guitar cables, also the there is a 3 conductor this is type seen on 1/4" plug on headphones. They are also referred to a 1/4" Tip, Ring, Sleeve or TRS, sometimes call a stereo 1/4". Even though a 1/4" TS would be correct it is usually never used, may will say a mono 1/4". Now that your brains are spinning are you having fun yet? John

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audio 'jack' terminology

In reply to: OK more info!

What I have a problem with is the fact that some people can't get their brain around the fact that a plug is a plug and a jack is a jack. There are TS plugs and TRS plugs. I do believe that there are no TS jacks nor TRS jacks. There are jacks that can make contact with Tips, Rings & Sleeves. Jacks have no tips. Jacks have not rings. Jacks have no sleeves.
It's as though some people insist on putting a square peg into a round hole. And, see no issue with that.

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links to amphenol connector drawings

In reply to: audio 'jack' terminology

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I assume that have never seen the inside of the female 1/4"

In reply to: audio 'jack' terminology

The female 1/4" jack has contact fingers that make contact with the tip and the ring. The hole in the jack makes contact with the sleeve part.
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/NYS230
Many times they are refereed to as 2 conductor or 3 conductor.
You could call it 1/4" jack a stereo or 1/4" TRS.
This item can go by many names, I have been using them for over 50 years and never had any problem figuring out the name part.

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