General discussion

Apple and Disabled People

Regarding the iPad, Am I the only person on the planet who cannot use a capacitive screen? I'm physically disabled and must type everything with one knuckle. I don't have the dexterity to do finger-tip operations. A friend lent his original iPhone to me for several minutes, but I couldn't even get it to acknowledge my existance! I can use resistive screens, just not capacitive ones (don't get me started about Multi-touch either).

Discussion is locked

Follow
Reply to: Apple and Disabled People
PLEASE NOTE: Do not post advertisements, offensive materials, profanity, or personal attacks. Please remember to be considerate of other members. If you are new to the CNET Forums, please read our CNET Forums FAQ. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Reporting: Apple and Disabled People
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Comments
- Collapse -
Does this help

You could get a stylus if you're able to hold one, some are designed for a capacitive screen.
And the iPad has a dock for a physical keyboard.

- Collapse -
Nice, but

Although those aren't bad ideas, I would have portability issues with them like anyone else.

- Collapse -
Curious...
- Collapse -
I don't know

I don't know. I suspect capacitive technology relies on the higher conductivity in fingertips.

- Collapse -
It is harder with a knucle for sure.

Pinch and zoom are out of the question with a a single digit though so I can see your point.

What about regular computers? What kind of interfaces do you find works best with them?

- Collapse -
Laptops work

Well, I've had a small fleet of Dell laptops over the years...

- Collapse -
(NT) so touch pads are good then.
- Collapse -
Yes, good enough

So why does Apple ignore people like me?

- Collapse -
One time someone asked that

And I had to ask if they were a customer. They said no and in doing so found their answer.

Companies tend to ignore all unless there is some money involved.
Bob

- Collapse -
Isn't that a Catch-22?

Point taken, but who can afford to buy things that they are unable to use? I have a capitalist's soul, but it did take a Class Action suit to get Microsoft to notice the Disabled. Now, free market forces are keeping me firmly in the Microsoft camp. Perhaps, it's Apple's turn.

- Collapse -
I hear you.

There has been some losses here in the USA so for now, vote with your wallet. Vote with your letters to your congress and so on.
Bob

- Collapse -
(NT) It is just sad that disabled people are so underrepresented.
- Collapse -
I was wondering about this...

What are some successful (or, least objectionable) input devices/methods that have addressed your disability? And...is there a tech product/service company that focuses on this market?

Best,
Shalin

- Collapse -
It's funny

It's funny how touchpads like me just fine. I'm unaware of anyone looking into the matter. Of course, in the interest of full disclosure, I have a full laptop with EVDO mounted on my wheelchair. About the only way Jobs could tempt me is with live sex on stage! Happy

- Collapse -
I was listening to the latest Gadgettes podcast...

...and there's a certain brand of mini-sausage that they use in Korea when cold weather makes fingers ineffective for using touch pads. A trip to the local deli might be in order.

- Collapse -
It's a thought

That story was also on a recent BOL, and I started to joke about it. My understanding is that only a couple types of sausage work, and I don't see disabled people carrying cold-cuts around just to use their idevices.

- Collapse -
Apple and Disabled People

I think that the iPad might do the same thing that the iPod touch and the iPhone.

- Collapse -
No doubt

I'm sure it is.

- Collapse -
Glove?
- Collapse -
Glove

Thanks, I appreciate the thought. However, that page shows how you can make a glove co-exist with a capacitive screen. I think that just further demonstrates Apple's lack of concern about actual needs. Do Apple users never use their devices in cold weather? I certainly do. (And yes, I know there are "Apple-friendly" gloves, but that begs the point.)

In my case, a glove would not help. The issue for me is that capacitive screens only work with your fingertips, and I cannot hold a fingertip steady.

- Collapse -
Apple Ipad and the disabled.

I hope the glove works. IF it does then that will be a faster found solution than many for the disabled in the past.
A sign perhaps of the progress of society on disabled issues perhaps. Though of small solace to you in your situation.

- Collapse -
Huh?

I'm afraid you misunderstood the web page you referred to, because that's a solution for people who wear gloves. It doesn't really bear on any disability.

I suppose that, if I really wanted an iPad, I would have to strap a little piece of metal over my knuckle. Happy

CNET Forums

Forum Info