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Apparently Linda Ronstadt made a BooBoo!

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Variant of same story

In reply to: Apparently Linda Ronstadt made a BooBoo!

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Re: Variant of same story/ Thanks Del.....

In reply to: Variant of same story

I think your link was more informative than mine:)
Glenda

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(NT) (NT) Yep, Elton John is right. They are going way too far..

In reply to: Variant of same story

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Huh?

In reply to: (NT) Yep, Elton John is right. They are going way too far..

Are you now trying to say the audience should not boo a performer for preaching politics at a performance?

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it is if its not what he wants to see you know

In reply to: Huh?

any body whom likes bush is a censor

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Booing...

In reply to: Huh?

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Are you saying that they should boo a performer for praching politics at a performance?
.

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(NT) (NT) Yes

In reply to: Booing...

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In that case...

In reply to: (NT) Yes

I guess Toby Keith deserves the same at his perfomances...

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(NT) (NT) Go for it...

In reply to: In that case...

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(NT) (NT) We're not that petty. We believe in Freedom of Speech.

In reply to: (NT) Go for it...

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(NT) (NT) Then exercise it. Boo away...

In reply to: (NT) We're not that petty. We believe in Freedom of Speech.

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Making A Scene...

In reply to: (NT) Then exercise it. Boo away...

Then exercise it. Boo away... - Clay

I do exercise my right. I just don't do so in a disrespectful or uncivil manner. If I was allowed to attend a GW rally, I certainly wouldn't try to silence him or make it difficult for others around me to hear what he has to say. After GW is done, I will most certainly point out all the flaws and disinformation that GW uses to supports his views. But I certainly wouldn't make a scene during his speech. Of course, the Secret Service wouldn't allow me to publicly disrupt and disrespect GW during his appearance. I would be quickly ushered out. It definitely wouldn't be a choice given to me...
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Interesting, Blake...

In reply to: Making A Scene...

That was interesting, Blake. It seems to me that you saying that that if a Kerry supporter boos Bush at a public speech, they are acting " in a disrespectful or uncivil manner".
Let's take the flip side and say it was a Kerry speech. If someone at the microphone mentioned something about Bush and people in the audience who suported Kerry booed the name of Bush or some thing that the speaker claimed that he had done, would that booing also be disrupting, "making a scene" or acting in a disrespectful or uncivil manner? I can't help but think that an answer might be that such would be O.K. to some people because they were booing the name of Bush rather than Kerry or Moore. Pure politics.

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Pure drivel

In reply to: Interesting, Blake...

J, you know that there is no comparison between booing a performer and booing in agreement with what the performer is against.

Dan

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(NT) (NT) People want a performer to perform not pontificate.

In reply to: Pure drivel

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So the appropriate reply

In reply to: (NT) People want a performer to perform not pontificate.

is to rudely disrupt the performance for everyone? How about not clapping instead?

Dan

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Blame the victim?

In reply to: So the appropriate reply

Last I checked it didn't say on any ticket I purchased that I had to only cheer the performer or stay silent. Seems the double standard is hard at work here. The audience is surely allowed in your world to also voice their objections? Ronstadt has expressed her clear intention to cause this type of response.

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The choices

In reply to: Blame the victim?

Applaud, be silent, be rude. I've never seen it on any ticket that you weren't supposed to be rude but many people try to avoid being rude when they attend such events. That is certainly the way that I was raised. It doesn't sound like a venue where there's a lot of give and take between audience and performer or some type of minor display of displeasure from some audience members might have been in order. The most appropriate way to voice your displeasure at a show is to not clap at the end. Or, if you can do it ever so quietly, to leave the auditorium.

This isn't a double standard, this is the standard for the show-going public. If you go to a show and the performer starts up with a pro bush commentary you are rude if you disrupt the show for those around you. I don't make these rules, it's just the way the world is.

Dan

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Your world maybe

In reply to: The choices

If she wants to do this with an audience she knows will be receptive (e.g. she could have been on stage recently with Whoopi in NYC) then she can expect a positive response. As it was, she got the response she, herself, stated she desired. It's rude of her to subject an audience to her politics when all they wanted was to hear some good music.

Her songs/lyrics don't generally fit into a political arena, so simple logic dictates that her audience is not there to hear her political views. I would give less credence to the objections of an audience that disagrees with the known political content of any performer's songs. I used to be a Springsteen fan, but don't listen to him anymore. If I were to attend a concert (cold day in He-double toothpicks) I wouldn't have a case if he espoused his well known politics.

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Real world

In reply to: Your world maybe

You never have an excuse to be rude.

Dan

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(NT) (NT) You don't seem to need one.

In reply to: Real world

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So you're saying...

In reply to: So the appropriate reply

It's OK for the performer to exercise their free speech on my dime but it's not OK to exercise my free speech in opposition?

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Re: So you're saying...

In reply to: So you're saying...

I'm saying that when you go to a show you cannot operate the performers by remote control. What they do is up to them. Your choice is to be polite or to be rude. Even if you don't like a performance those around you might be. They're on their dime, too. There is an understanding when you go to a show. The performer will perform pretty much what they want and you will be polite and considerate of the others in the audience. You are not required to applaud. If you can leave without disrupting the show for those around you, you may do so. You also agree to deferring the exercising of your free speech rights until such time as you can do it without disturbing the show. Out in the lobby, after the show, during intermission, etc. would all be fine.

You certainly wouldn't get up in the middle of a song and start speaking, would you?

Dan

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Perhaps ...

In reply to: Re: So you're saying...

... you can understand that rude behavior by the audience precipitated by rude behavior of an entertainer is justified.

As to the rest, you are pulling a DK turning an engine into a yacht. Since there were folks cheering as well, and there was no finger of blame pointed at just the booers as being the ones that tossed drinks, we don't know who was disruptive and/or a rude audience now do we.

Since when is it forbidden to boo an entertainer? You think an audience should cheer or ****?

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Re: Perhaps ...

In reply to: Perhaps ...

Rude behavior is never justified. Even by someone else's rude behavior. Traditionally, cheering is not rude behavior. This includes many forms of showing appreciation for a performer.

Booing, on the other hand, is considered rude. Throwing drinks is rude, too, and should not be engaged in if one wishes to consider oneself a polite person.

I don't use the language you allude to in your closing acronym. That's how I was raised. It is, of course, not forbidden to boo an entertainer. It is, of course, rude and inconsiderate.

Dan

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Refusing To Buckle To Pressure...

In reply to: Perhaps ...

Perhaps you can understand that rude behavior by the audience precipitated by rude behavior of an entertainer is justified. - Evie

It's interesting that you equate expressing a political viewpoint as being rude. During the State of the Union addresses by our Presidents, they too are expressing political opinions where two diverse groups sit and listen. Presidents are well known for airing their views, which often are in direct contrast to the views of many in the audience. Those who agree with the President's remarks tend to clap and cheer loudly while those who don't respectfully sit and listen. Perhaps you would prefer that those who disagree with the the President should boo and get up and leave the room, throwing drinks at pictures along the way???

Many performers of both sides of the political divide have expressed their views during their performances. The only thing that has changed recently is that the performers who support the Democrats are being punished for those views. This is a clear sign of censorship that has reached the national level...

It's too bad that our country has fallen to this divisive level of intolerance. Sadly, it seems that we are repeating Germany's history. Hopefully all performers will refuse to buckle to the overwhelming pressure and continue freely sharing their views...
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What is really interesting is that you don't...

In reply to: Refusing To Buckle To Pressure...

realize that you, Dan, DaveK, Charlie, and many others including Moore and Kerry themselves are the "useful fools" that Lenin spoke so highly of.

Stalin was fond of referring to people such as yourself with your "blame America" philosophies as both "useful fools" (like Lenin) and "useful idiots". Khrushchev also used them interchangably and is said to have been well aware of the tremendous assistance to the communist cause such tools provided.

You "useful tools" are still providing that assistance to America's enemies. Robert Conquest describes it well in his book The Great Terror (Macmillan, 1968) was intended for presentation to "useful fools", such as university professors and people working in the press, radio and TV. You ought to read it.

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Re: So you're saying...

In reply to: Re: So you're saying...

You also agree to deferring the exercising of your free speech rights until such time as you can do it without disturbing the show.

Oh, it's OK for the performer to disturb the show I paid for but it's not OK for me to return the favor?
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Re: So you're saying...

In reply to: Re: So you're saying...

The performer chooses what and how to perform within the guidlines of their contract.

It's never ok for a member of the audience to disturb the show.

Dan

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Re: So you're saying...

In reply to: Re: So you're saying...

It's never ok for a member of the audience to disturb the show.

We'll have to agree to disagree then. If they sell me tickets for a concert and I get a political speech instead, I'm going to disturb the show...

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