Networking & Wireless forum

Question

Advice to replace 9 year old Linksys router

by Big Steve / June 13, 2015 8:18 PM PDT

I have a 9 year old Linksys router; model #WRT54G that is 9 years old and I would like to replace it with something new but something that will work with my current computer. I have a 6 year old Dell Vostro 1510 laptop which has Windows Vista. The wireless card that came installed in the computer is a Dell Wireless 1395 802.11g Mini Card.

I called Linksys sales the other day; spoke to a guy in India. I was considering purchasing a Linksys WRT54GL which is the replacement model for my Linksys WRT54G router but the guy with Linksys in India told me Linksys no longer supported the WRT54GL model; he recommended another model; a Linksys EA6500 Dual Band Smart Wi-Fi AC router; he said it was a wireless "N" router and it was much faster than my old wireless "g" router.

An employee at Walmart told me the other day I should also consider a wireless "N" router. Would a wireless "N" router work with my 6 year old Dell Vostro 1510 laptop which has a Dell Wireless 1395 802.11g Mini Card? I assume the "g" in the description of the card means it's a "g" speed card?

I don't know anything about routers which is why I came here to this forum to ask my question but my Linksys WRT54G router has given me good service for the last 9 years so should I purchase another "g" router or should I switch to a wireless "N" router? I'm also considering purchasing an LED HDTV Smart set soon; would I need to purchase a specific type of router that would also work with an LED HDTV Smart TV?


Big Steve
06/13/15

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All Answers

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Answer
Channels of g and n
by James Denison / June 13, 2015 10:02 PM PDT

wider channels, means channel overlap for anyone else using b or g connection to the router.

http://www.dailywireless.org/category/wi-fi-news/page/95/

40 MHz channels are incorporated into 802.11n, doubling the channel space from 20 MHz in previous 802.11a/g standards. This allows for a doubling of the data rate over a single 20 MHz channel. It can be enabled in the 5 GHz mode, or within the 2.4 GHz if there is knowledge that it will not interfere with any other 802.11 or non-802.11 (such as Bluetooth) system using those same frequencies.

Of course there just isn’t much room on the 2.4 GHz band for “N”, which requires two channels. Most users will want to use 5 GHz to reduce interference from current 802b/g WiFi products, not to mention Bluetooth, wireless phones and other consumer devices.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11#Channel_spacing_within_the_2.4.C2.A0GHz_band

(Invalid img)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/NonOverlappingChannels2.4GHz802.11-en.svg

A router with n should allow setting for g only, where needed.

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add this good advice column
by James Denison / June 13, 2015 10:07 PM PDT
In reply to: Channels of g and n
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Re: add this good advice column
by Big Steve / June 14, 2015 7:03 AM PDT

Good article on wireless networking; still not clear on which router I should go with. Even though the guy in India with Linksys tech support who told me the other night that Linksys no longer supported the router I was interested in to replace my 9 year old one; the model I looked at the other night on Linksys's website was a model #WRT54GL which according to Linksys's website is their replacement model for my 9 year old model; model #WRT54G; should I still consider switching to a wireless N router? Would I be able to use a wireless N router to watch programing on a Smart HDTV set?


Big Steve
06/14/15

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If it's not exclusive to "N" only
by James Denison / June 14, 2015 8:01 AM PDT

then sure, get one.

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Re: If it's not exclusive to "N" only
by Big Steve / June 14, 2015 2:55 PM PDT

So are you saying upgrade to an "N" router or purchase the replacement model for my old one; the Linksys WRT54GL?


Big Steve
06/14/15

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I only give information
by James Denison / June 14, 2015 3:50 PM PDT

You have to make the decision. I don't know how many users you have for the wifi, nor the devices they use. Some new wifi dongles ONLY do "n" now, but most routers maybe all still do "g" even if "n" capable.

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Re: I only give information
by Big Steve / June 14, 2015 9:29 PM PDT

I am the only person in the house; I have this Dell laptop which I'm posting this reply on and one Dell Dimension 3100 desktop computer. I have a nice HP inkjet printer but it's not a wireless one. I don't own a tablet or a smart phone either. I guess you could say I'm wireless poor. Thanks for the info.


Big Steve
06/14/15

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(NT) then get the "n"
by James Denison / June 15, 2015 12:44 PM PDT
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Answer
Sadly, no one seems to discuss this area.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 14, 2015 3:18 PM PDT
http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Electronics-Computer-Routers/zgbs/electronics/300189 shows these are so cheap today that for your 20 dollars no one does more than check you out at the register. Yes any 802.11n or 802.11ac supports your 802.11g speed cards but your posts contain many long questions and give me the impression you should head to Best Buy and have the Geek Squad set you up. At that time you can get the installer to answer all your questions or you will refuse service and send then away.

It's a sad story about how the product costs have gone so low that no one in sales can be bothered.
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Re: Sadly, no one seems to discuss this area.
by Big Steve / June 14, 2015 9:35 PM PDT

I plan to go to one of the Best Buys in my area this week to look at some of their HDTV sets. I've never been inside of a Best Buy store before but hopefully the sales clerks won't pounce on me the minute I enter their door.


Big Steve
06/14/15

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Answer
you don't want old technology
by renegade600 / June 14, 2015 3:31 PM PDT

imo, it would be better to get a wireless n router. You will not have to make any changes to your current computers and devices other than if you change your security settings. When you get your new tv, just add the settings to the tv and it should work. No special router needed. I have a netgear wndr3400. It is a good middle of the road router. my suggestion would be no matter what router you get, make sure it is n600. see the following for more info. Though the link is netgear, the info is true for all models

http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/21918/~/what-does-it-mean-when-a-router-is-described-as-being-n150%2Fn300%2Fn600%2Fn750%2Fn900%3F (link edited by moderator)

Post was last edited on June 14, 2015 3:43 PM PDT

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Re: you don't want old technology
by Big Steve / June 14, 2015 10:04 PM PDT

Thanks for the link; some interesting reading. I read CNET's review on your router. CNET gave it good reviews except for the following:

The Netgear N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400 is a great dual-band router for any home at an affordable price. Its lack of "Gigabit Ethernet" might steer enthusiasts away, however.

I'll Google "Gigabit Ethernet" later to see what that means.


Big Steve
06/14/15

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Re: you don't want old technology
by Big Steve / June 17, 2015 7:37 PM PDT

I just came from Dell.com and I was looking at routers and they have this model on sale by Linksys; details below.

Linksys EA6200 - wireless router - 802.11a/b/g/n/ac (draft 2.0) - desktop, wall-mountable

Regular price: $139.99
Sale price: $48.99

Is this a good router to replace my 9 year old Linksys WRT54G router? I was in a chat with someone on Dell.com and the person on the other end told me it was a brand new factory sealed model; it was not a refurbished model.

I was curious about the price savings; now I'm going to go read some reviews about it and check Linksys' website to see if in fact it is a brand new model or not and to also see if I can connect it to a Dell WIN HOME XP desktop computer or not.


Big Steve
06/17/15

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