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About the Anthony Weiner thing but not political in nature

by Steven Haninger / June 10, 2011 9:37 AM PDT

I have to wonder how it is that higher profile people...those who want public attention...don't seen to get the message that people really are watching them. Even though they're doing nothing that's not going on elsewhere, they've deliberately placed themselves in public view. You'd think that, after a few of their cohorts are busted, the rest would get it. Instead we get a constant parade of Darwin Award candidates from our politicians and others of celebrity status. Or maybe it's us that doesn't get it and this is the new normal. In too many cases we see such people not only survive but come back stronger. I guess "The times are (still) 'a changin'".

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I said earlier that you wonder what goes through
by Diana Forum moderator / June 10, 2011 10:00 AM PDT

their minds. They always seem to think that normal rules don't apply and they will never get caught. Do they think they are rock stars and can get away with wild living? Who knows. I just sit back and shake my head.

Diana

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I think that they believe they have a kind of immunity to
by Ziks511 / June 10, 2011 2:29 PM PDT

the stuff that happens to regular folk. Some of it comes from having something of a charmed life, great good luck as time goes by. Some of it is that they start believing their own supporters and promoters. And some of it is just that the power goes to their heads. "I'm here, people treat me differently, they look up to me, they ask my opinions on everything. Maybe I am that clever that I'll never get caught.

And don't underestimate the sexual allure of all that power. Women start reacting to them differently, certain types of men start reacting to them differently. And when everybody is filling your head with every form of seductive behaviour, people screw up.

Truthfully, this is a very small sin the word peccadillo was coined for it (well adopted from Italy or Spain anyway). It's the people who are in the pockets of various interests, Big Coal, Big Oil, Big Industry Big Commerce, Big Banking and Big Investing who are causing the real havoc, and rarely (Randy Cunningham is an unusual example, as is Tom DeLay) get caught. They acquire wealth, and use their power not for their constituents as a whole but for Special Interests of limited numbers of people. I don't remember if it's 1% of the people who earn more than $250,000 a year or if it's 2%, but it hardly matters. That's the number of people that most Senators and many Congressmen are concerned with, and the other 98% can suffer at the whims of a manipulated market.

Franklin Roosevelt's solution to the Big Investment houses colluding and playing games with other peoples' money was to appoint just about the worst crook in the business, Joseph P. Kennedy and tell him to write regulations which would put a stop to it. And Kennedy did. The SEC did its job for years, but was torn down brick by brick regulation by regulation by all those Senators and Congressmen who came after, just doing favours for some very special friends.

Additionally, the farther we get away from that appalling upheaval, the more forgetful we become. Things worked so well for so long that Ronald Reagan could stand up and say that the problem was Regulation, not the Theft Graft and Corruption that had been stopped by that Regulation. And people, forgetful as they are, bought it.

Why were bailed out Banks and Investment houses allowed to pay bonuses out of the money American Taxpayers reluctantly gave them. It reminds me of reading Day of the Locust which was about Hollywood, but it's the same thing fundamentally. The people who actually do the work, who think up the ideas for cars or computer software or any other form of work are paid a pittance while the manipulators collect their unearned income, and avoid paying taxes on it as well. There was a time when over 60% of the workforce was unionized and with a few exceptions (the Teamsters, the Longshoremen) they got a decent wage and the promise of a pension. Now less than 30% are unionized, and they are treated as if they belong to that 1 or 2% who use the US economy as their own private Slurpee. And they didn't pay for it in the first place.

Bill Gates is a very smart guy. He's so smart he didn't invent DOS, he bought it from the guy who did invent it, and wrote every line of code in it for $50,000. And then he created that astonishing place in Redmond, Washington where a thousand people work, and the perks are great, but so is the burn-out rate, and there's no long term benefits for those who can't keep up with the grind.

If the distribution of income were the same as it was in 1970 everybody except that 1% would be better off by thousands a year, and there wouldn't be an ongoing fiscal crisis, because those people pay taxes at a far higher rate than the 1 or 2% who live off your work, and your income, and do their damnedest to ensure that the system stays broken, Because broken as it is, it works for them and it works for their paid stooges in Washington too.

Frank Capra, alias Rob Boyter.

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When over 60% of the workforce was unionized...
by J. Vega / June 11, 2011 3:05 AM PDT

When was the time when over 60% of the workforce was unionized?

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You're absolutely right, I've been misled by the huge power
by Ziks511 / June 11, 2011 3:26 AM PDT

attributed to the current Union movement in the United States. The peak enrollment that I can find in the literature on line was in 1953. It was 29.6%. You will find it in Table 4 of
http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/friedman.unions.us
current national levels of unionization I find hard to find viz the breakdown found in
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/union2.nr0.htm
which suggests an over all level of unionization of about 12.4%.

Thanks for bringing me up short, and insisting on real figures.

Rob

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"God gave Man a brain and a *****, but only enough blood to
by Ziks511 / June 10, 2011 2:33 PM PDT

operate one at a time." Robin Williams and a host of other comedians, there is much controversy.

Rob I didn't write it, though I wish I had, but I did remember it. And yes, I'm sleeping alone again.

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Something I've wondered about
by TONI H / June 10, 2011 7:41 PM PDT

Women politicians have never gotten into these types of situations....but they DO have a tendency to shoot themselves and their lives in the foot as teachers and exhibit this same type of behavior.

The pattern for this type of destructive behavior seems to me that men veer into politics and women veer into educational roles.....but I can't understand why neither one of them, when both career moves point in the direction of very intelligent abilities, are smart/intelligent enough to see early on that the sh.. will be hitting the fan in a relatively short period of time if they don't put on the brakes.

Also, I don't understand how both of those career decisions don't seem to carry any signal waaaay ahead of time that these people have a very destructive personality trait that they are dragging along with them....have none of these people developed into 'sickos' until AFTER they have been in their chosen career for YEARS, and why is that? Destructive behavior usually rears its ugly head early on in life....why are these two career choices able to hide that so well for so long?

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What I've not understood about men of power versus
by Steven Haninger / June 10, 2011 8:07 PM PDT

women of power is how such is displayed. With all that said about not inviting trouble, why does it seem that so many women go out of their way to create an image of themselves as being "hot" and attempt to retain that image as long as possible? But, when "hit up on", they balk and claim to want respect. I've never understood why any young girl would aspire to be a "supermodel" and parade around in their underwear and skimpy bathing suits. I did see a TV interview with a group of them a few years ago and something close to that question was raised. The almost unanimous answer was that it gave them a feeling of power. Well...power over what? I'm not saying that some men don't do similarly but not in the numbers that women seem to. This enigma about women will remain with me into the grave. Happy

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Women exhibit power in the ways they are taught, as do men.
by Ziks511 / June 11, 2011 4:08 PM PDT

Some young girls look at the world and see Paris Hilton, or Lindsay Lohan or some pop star or one of the endless bimbos and arm candy and think that that is exercising power. Some of them look at Madeleine Albright or Hillary Clinton or several University Presidents and think that is power and choose that direction.

The Kennedy Men all exercised their "power" the way Dad taught them. Though politically they were all very astute.

But that's only half the story, infidelity occurs in about 57% of men and 54% of women
http://infidelityfacts.com/infidelity-statistics.html
http://www.bbcamerica.com/content/349/factoids.jsp

In the Wikipedia article on Infidelity many aspects are discussed, but the most common ones to emerge are role reversals, the desire of men to be nurturing to their mistress, the desire of women to break out of the conventional mould with their boy toy.

I have personally experienced what I considered really odd responses. 6 months after we married, one of Nancy's co-workers made a very strong and explicit play for me. Why? She was very attractive and as far as I was concerned could have had anybody she wanted, but she wanted me. Was it her form of a power game, beating a competing female? There were two or three more subtle plays from other women, despite the fact that we were known to be married. So far as I know or Nancy has mentioned, nobody made a play for her.

Secondarily, within a year of our getting married, Nancy lost virtually all interest in my interests, the things that made me happy or feel good, As pretty much everybody here knows the biggest of these is music. She returned to playing Carole King records and Peter Frampton etc which was a bit alienating but then she began to belittle me aloud, in front of my friends when I was playing, particularly with other people, because when I'm playing with somebody I'm unfamiliar with I go very interior, very into my head and my eyes don't focus, because I'm wondering where he's going to go with his playing and whether I should play harmony or a contrasting lead or where the piece of music ought to end and how. Almost everybody has seen a pick up group get into a trainwreck at the end of a song, even a familiar one because endings are structured, and you have to fit into the pattern, or you keep leading into the end of the song, and somebody plays something which doesn't end the song.

On the other hand, I continued learning what she was learning but it wasn't as much fun, and the enjoyment came from interaction with other people, particularly the big internist who, when his residents couldn't answer the question would turn to me, an orderly or technician, for the answer which I gave in detail. Now it's not that hard if you've got a decent brain, and you've heard the questions dozens of times each, but the guy really liked me and my way of speaking (very obviously university educated) so he ended up being the one who made my wife's work fun for me.

When my son came along, I was very frightened of the concept of being a parent, but Nancy just couldn't connect with the infant, so I became the Mom, the nurturer, the interpreter of cries and noises and babbling and turning it into language. I was the guy who could put any baby to sleep. It became kind of a party trick, even in the Pediatrics ward which was near where my office was. The nurses had a 3 day old with "failure to thrive" which is kind of a post birth trauma. If a baby is held securely and is treated confidently they settle down and stop worrying about their new unfamiliar environment. We used No Name Kleenex which came in a bright yellow box with big black letters. While we were changing his diaper, he'd watch that box, squirming as we rolled him around to keep his head and his eyes focussed on that box, so the box stayed there for the next year or more, in the same place so that his world was developing structure. To put him to sleep during fretful times, I placed him face down on the bed (a real no-no now) and patted his back, but strongly and in odd rhythms especially 3 out of 4, 3 pats and then a missed one, then three and a space again. So I asked about the little boy who was crying (and nobody was in there with him) and they said he'd been crying for three days, and had dropped 1/3 of his body weight which is really serious, so I said, I'll put him to sleep, and I got that look. The one women give men who think they can do things only women are supposed to do. So I went in his room, and cuddled him and danced him around the room a bit singing Sur le Pont d"Avignon which is a 3 strong beat with one weak beat song, holding him firmly. Then I put him face down, and continued patting in time, and 20 minutes later I walked out to the Nurses station and said "He's asleep." They all looked at one another and went running for the room, and he was nicely asleep and stayed asleep for 4 hours. He woke up with a cry, I asked for his milk or formula and gave it to him, talking to him and making lots of eye contact and bouncing him a little, then I burped him and put him down and put him asleep for another 4 hours. The staff in Paeds never entirely got over that.

Nancy was not a happy camper from infancy to about 8 years old though she did very well once he turned about 10, and was better than I was in dealing with his adolescent years, not because there were problems, but because she could figure out how to talk to him without making him self conscious whereas I was too direct.

The way Nancy fed her emptiness was to spend money, and eventually that killed our relationship. I spent money too, but mine was on the walls as Japanese art, or on the shelves as Records, or stereo equipment or TV/VCR stuff. I still don't know where Nancy spends her money. She earns more than $100,000 a year, but can't come up with $300 a month for me from now 'til the end of the year. She can't find $2100 between now and December 1st, boy do I feel treated with contempt. I rented this place based on her promise because I knew i couldn't afford it. Instead of the house I put $130,000 into out of $235,000 back about 1994, we have nothing, no savings for Robbie's University, no retirement funds for me. I've got a nice apartment, but it's very expensive on a Disability Pension, and she's got a nice penthouse apartment that costs $1350 a month, but she has trouble making ends meet. She's behind on her taxes. i always tried to teach her that I needed financial security, but she deliberately made us less and less secure until I blew up at her and the police were called. I was out of the house and gone that day in January 2006 and have never been back except to collect some of my possessions.

Now as tangential as that is, it is still about the peculiar things people to make them selves feel good or feel secure. I loved finding new music, sometimes I bought albums based just on the cover. The first Dire Straits album was like that at Schoolkids Records. They had 3 British imports, and I looked at the cover and went, there's something here, and boy was I right. Anybody remember Cindy Bullens? She was a one hit wonder, but I bought it on the basis of the cover thinking Nancy's going to like this. and I was right again.

Finding stuff that I like, and sharing it with other people, especially the ones who don't think they're going to like it, and succeeding is a great feeling. It's why I thought I'd be a good teacher, and had my health held up til my dissertation was finished, I would have been at some University. And I could have gently led the kids away from the United States is the most perfect country in the world, and has never made a mistake, which still stalks the halls of many Universities. People just skip over the Spanish American War by talking about Teddy Roosevelt, and not the head-hunting in the Philipines carried out by American troops, And they pass right over Nicaragua in the 1930's when the US Marines routinely committed atrocities and documented them in books that nobody reads. There is so much knowledge out there that we should all live 3 lifetimes just to learn enough to look at things now and go "This IS Wrong." 50 years from now, or earlier if I finish my dissertation, people are going to say "Didn't they see what the consequences of those actions would be??"

Rob 2 AM, a little woozy because my stomach is upset.

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Isn't 'education' a form of 'nurturing'?
by drpruner / June 11, 2011 4:08 AM PDT

FWIW I'm told that powerful women now exhibit the corollary behavior to 'not keeping it in one's pants'. Pool boys and male interns, for choice.

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If we're speaking about teachers, for many of them the
by Ziks511 / June 16, 2011 11:39 AM PDT

answer is No. I was lucky with my teachers, but I met some profoundly nasty ones, and had one in Grade 3 who chose me to be the scape goat for that year. The second I got away from her I soared. My son had one in Grade 2 who as mentioned before in early October telephoned us at home and eventually said "Robbie has been assessed as gifted and as a candidate for further testing but I don't believe it." What she didn't say is that the assessment had been done by her in class, ticking off boxes on evaluation sheets while she observed the class. Initially I just talked conversationally with her and sort of went along with it, but about 15 minutes after I put down the phone I was ready to kill somebody I was so angry. The anger was partly that initial sentence and her subsequent efforts to convince me not to have him tested. Of course we did, and he tested very well as we knew he would and he got a chance to go to a school with an enrichment program, but he wasn't happy leaving his friends from his old school.

Some women mimic powerful men, and there have been predatory or very sexual women through history. Women just don't suffer from the testoterone poisoning some men have, which frequently is part of their drive and their predatoriness as well. The Alec Baldwin character in Glengarry Glenross was a classic example, pure poison to his colleagues and those beneath him, and all smiles with customers and women.

In the medical field most women don't act like artificial men, even those who choose surgery. The men on the other hand were pretty predatory.

Some predatory or hyper sexual women marry the biggest A type they can find able to provide the big house and pool and then make plays for the gardeners or the pool boy, but again I think a lot of that is acting out a role, just as some men act out roles.

Rob

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from teachers to sexually aggressive women
by James Denison / June 16, 2011 1:06 PM PDT

That was quite a stretch. I must have had the other kind of teachers.

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Makes no sense to me either
by Josh K / June 12, 2011 11:22 PM PDT

These are public figures and they're deliberately putting compromising photos of themselves on the Internet. And it will likely happen again, even after this.

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But wait...There's more !!
by Tony Holmes / June 15, 2011 6:16 AM PDT
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Sorry,I can't resist this one...
by Tony Holmes / June 15, 2011 6:51 AM PDT
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RE: Weiner is going down in "flames"...lol.
by JP Bill / June 15, 2011 6:59 AM PDT

I was thinking more of

Throw another Weiner on the Barbie.

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my kid sent me this one
by James Denison / June 15, 2011 7:43 AM PDT
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Bets on whether or not this guy ends up
by Steven Haninger / June 15, 2011 7:11 AM PDT

on suicide watch? If 1/2 of what's coming out since he first admitted some guilt, the guy has some real problems with his personal worth.

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depends
by James Denison / June 15, 2011 7:46 AM PDT

And please don't think I mean adult diapers, let's not send Weiner there, lol. A lot depends on what his pregnant wife says & does I think.

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You're right about the marriage
by Steven Haninger / June 15, 2011 8:16 AM PDT
In reply to: depends

The guy is in deep doo-doo with his party, much of the nation and maybe his wife. It appears that he's been thinking he's some kind of male "hottie". One look at him and the pictures tell me he needs a new mirror, his eyes examined, or he's living in some Walter Mitty fantasy. If all comes crashing at once, some can't handle it and find a way to check out. I would not be surprised if this guy heading toward that threshold.

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It's been mentioned
by TONI H / June 15, 2011 8:46 PM PDT

a few times very early on in this story by the MSM no less that Weiner has an ego that won't let go of that position easily because it's all he knows how to do and really believes nobody can do it better than him. Which is kind of surprising for them to make that kind of comment when supposedly he was intending on leaving it and running for mayor.

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The article says....
by Josh K / June 16, 2011 12:01 AM PDT

....those pictures were taken when he was a college student, around 18 years old. It could have been a frat prank. Or not.

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does seem a bit unfair
by James Denison / June 16, 2011 1:00 AM PDT
In reply to: The article says....

to go after him for stuff done in college days, but it does serve to show a continuing pattern from that time to this.

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