The CNET Lounge forum

General discussion

ABC to offer shows online for free; with ad support

by dlgriffin / March 1, 2006 10:15 PM PST

Hey,

Here is an article from Ad Age talking about ABC's plan to launch shows on their website for free with ads. Personally I would love this except I dont watch to much on ABC but I think this is the way to go. I will watch the ads and this actually makes perfect sense to me.

The article for anyone who wants it is down below:

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) ?- Walt Disney Co. is expanding the availability of its hit shows via ABC.com as part of its plans to create the "network of the future." CEO Bob Iger detailed the soon-to-launch product called My ABC, which will provide consumers with the opportunity to download shows free of charge.

Bear Stearns conference_?Mike Shaw [ABC's president ad sales and marketing] announced today we are going to take a product to market in May," Mr. Iger said at the Bear Stearns media conference in Florida this week. "Viewers will have the ability to access shows such as 'Lost,' 'Desperate Housewives' and 'Grey?s Anatomy' on ABC.com. They will be ad supported, free to the consumer.?
Ads that accompany the video offering would not necessarily be the same as those that appeared during the show's broadcast, he said.
Mr. Iger said Disney wanted to try a variety of business models for its product, whether subscription or advertising supported. ABC shows are also offered via Apple iTunes and iPod platforms for $1.99 a pop. Those shows come without ad involvement.

'New direct commerce opportunities'_Mr. Iger said Disney was looking to create a number of revenue models but because the company did not wish to turn its back on the ad community, it would create new opportunities for them.
?There is so much greater consumption of media, the opportunity for advertisers are greater; look at what Google has managed to do,? Mr. Iger said. ?Our job is to create the new networks and new direct commerce opportunities.?
So far greater availability of ABC's shows via Apple?s iTunes does not appear to have dented the shows' ratings, something advertisers had feared might happen if consumers could find them elsewhere at anytime. For the week of Feb. 20, ?Grey?s Anatomy? ranked No. 6 in the Nielsen Media Research ratings, watched by 24.7 million households, just behind coverage of the Winter Olympics Feb. 23.
Gary Carr, senior VP-director of national broadcast at TargetCast TCM, New York, said: ?The one thing advertisers are worried about is whether people are watching the commercials and are they watching the shows??

Not yet selling new platform_He said ABC not yet started selling the new platform, but noted that CBS, which has a deal to offer its hit shows via Comcast?s video-on-demand platform, does so with the advertising that runs on the linear network intact.
?Its good that they?re all trying different things. They?re testing a lot of models that can generate additional revenues,? he concluded.
NBC also offers many of its network shows on the iTunes platform -- "The Office" is one of the top performers -- while Fox is offering two network shows, "Prison Break" and "24," through satellite sibling DirecTV's VOD system for 99 cents.

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: ABC to offer shows online for free; with ad support
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: ABC to offer shows online for free; with ad support
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Yes!
by scott_wilder / March 1, 2006 10:42 PM PST

I totally think that offering up your shows as pay for AND ad based is the way to go.

Personally, I wouldn't use it a ton. Only for the reason that I like to watch TV on my TV. I want to be immersed in the TV experience, not just watch it on my little 17 inch screen.

So I probably would be more likely to download the occasional episode for the cost of having to watch a few ads.

Scott

Collapse -
Hmm interesting...
by jplewis01 / March 1, 2006 11:18 PM PST

Hmmm interesting No that push really has turned to shove will we really watch for free with ads? If these are the same ads you've already polluted me with every 10 mins in current broadcasts that the answer is no I'll take the free programming and skip the ads! Reason... I watch less than 3-4 hours of television a week because you overload the current medium with ads I won't download a show to watch it if I'm going to be bombarded with ads every 10 mins. I already turn off shows like Discovery Sundays when the ads hit every 8-10 mins for 4-5 mins. I'm not going accept anyone marketing to me for half my waking hours. If you think we'll swallow free downloadable TV with a 10-25% ad loading think again. I think we would tolerate 5 mins of ads every 30 mins or 2-3mins every 20mins, but no more than that. And if you front load the show with ads inside the first 20 mins we're gone. We don't the TV medium now because the advertising turns us off, don't think different medium same mindset. Its different players with different tolerances and expectations.

Phil

Collapse -
two reasons to download shows
by beelissa / March 2, 2006 12:29 AM PST

To my way of thinking, there are two reasons to download shows:

First, if I missed it when it was on TV or didn't want to watch it then.

Second, if I want to take it with me on a portable device.

For either one, I'd rather get it free with ads. Even if I fast forward through ads, I find it takes me about an hour to watch a TV show that took an hour to air. I might save 2-3 min. but it's not noticable. I'd rather get ads than pay for most of the content that's out there.

So, I was disappointed because this article seems to be saying that you will be able to go to ABC's website and watch, that it will be streaming, but not that you can download it.

I also wanted to say one thing about ratings. I would think if they saw a decrease in ratings when they made this video available on their website, they could just tell the number of hits or whatever, and add that to their total rating. Some companies will want to pay to advertise on the internet because the viewer has the ability to click and respond to an ad right away.

Collapse -
ABC and Fox streaming shows don't work with Vista
by topherbone / April 5, 2007 7:09 AM PDT

Ahh...I thought I'd try out ABC.com or Fox's video on demand today and found out that neither (ABC's full screen doesn't but their small screen does) work with Windows Vista but work with XP. I thought I was getting the benefits of the "latest and greatest" but now I'm getting "Better last than never".
Has anyone else gotten around this problem?

Collapse -
I think ABC got it right for solid longterm
by nutjob / April 5, 2007 9:57 AM PDT

Why would ABC want anyone to download for free - so that you could skip commericial? That cost them money with little or no return.

I like the NBC and ABC method. Go online get it for free with 2-4 minutes of ads or purchase from Itunes without ads. It makes them some money and offers the consumers choice.

Collapse -
I'm right there with you
by topherbone / April 5, 2007 11:03 AM PDT

Yeah, I really like that all the networks are doing the ad-supported streaming for their shows. It saves me with the wife when the MCE fails to record a show or like our Fox affiliate did during the finale of Prison Break...5 min of blank air in the middle of the show.
I'm hoping that NBC might eventually make their shows downloadable on Itunes as podcasts like they do with their nightly news.

Collapse -
ABC to offer shows online for free; with ad support
by dlgriffin / April 6, 2007 12:22 PM PDT

I don't know what's going on here - but my username seems to have been hijacked. I had absolutely no part in posting this message.

Collapse -
Probably not hijacked.
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / April 6, 2007 6:51 PM PDT

Hi dlgriffin.

I doubt anyone has hijacked your username. If you check the first post in this discussion it is dated March 2, 2006, well before the post you say is your first post on March 11, 2007. They couldn't have hijacked your username before you posted.

However, it may be a glitch in the forum software. I have let CNET's techs know and they will have a look at it. It may be a few days unfortunately. Easter is upon us and so it may not get seen to until sometime next week.

I have tracked this discussion, so let us know if you have any more difficulties in the meantime.

Mark

Collapse -
more about CBS...
by ddubb / April 6, 2007 7:52 PM PDT

They offer full episodes on the web for free with different advertising than what originally appeared on the show. There are fewer ads, and they're shorter, and you can't fast forward through them.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

GIVEAWAY

Turn up the volume with our Apple Byte sweeps!

Two lucky winners will take home the coveted smart speaker that lets Siri help you around your connected house. This sweepstake ends Feb. 25, 2018.